Here’s Why Owning an Electric Vehicle in Colorado is Superlative

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While electric vehicles (EVs) may have once seemed impractical, the technology to operate them is quickly evolving. And depending on where you live, electric may be a better choice.

The latest LendingTree study determined the states with the best electric vehicle infrastructure by calculating the rate of charging ports, laws and incentives, and the adoption rate (and how it’s changed).

In addition to exploring our findings, stick around for tips on what to consider when going electric, including auto insurance costs.

  • Colorado has the best electric vehicle infrastructure. It finishes in the top 10 in three of four categories evaluated (rate of charging ports, electric car laws and incentives, and adoption rate) and no lower than 14th overall. New York and Massachusetts follow in second and third, respectively. The states with the worst electric vehicle infrastructure are South Dakota, Kentucky and North Dakota.
  • The District of Columbia leads with 33.2 public electric vehicle charging ports per 10,000 drivers. In a distant second, Vermont has 15.8 charging ports per 10,000 drivers. Only two other states have a rate above 10.0: Massachusetts (12.8) and California (12.1). Conversely, Mississippi has just 1.5 charging ports per 10,000 drivers, followed by Louisiana at 1.7 — the only states below 2.0.
  • California has 269 electric vehicle laws and incentives — the most of any state. The next highest state — and the only other above 100 — is Colorado, at 102. Meanwhile, Nebraska (15) has the fewest laws and incentives, with North Dakota and Kansas close behind at 16 each.
  • The District of Columbia has the highest electric vehicle adoption rate (the number of electric, plug-in hybrid and hybrid vehicle registrations divided by the number of light-duty vehicle registrations) at 8.2%. California (7.7%) and Washington (6.0%) follow. Mississippi and North Dakota tie for the lowest adoption rate, at 1.0% each. Between 2021 and 2022, the electric vehicle adoption rate grew 24.9% across the U.S., with Oklahoma (37.7%), New Jersey (35.5%) and Nevada (34.1%) seeing the largest jumps.
  • Since 2012, only 13 states have experienced an increase in carbon dioxide emissions. Idaho (29.7%) saw the largest jump — more than 20 percentage points higher than the next highest state, Washington (8.7%). Nationally, carbon dioxide emissions fell 6.1% from 2012 to 2021.

Across the four categories analyzed to determine the state with the best electric vehicle infrastructure, Colorado ranks in the top 10 in three, finishing 14th in the other. More specifically, Colorado ranks:

  • Second in electric car laws and incentives, with 102
  • Sixth in the rate of charging ports (9.4 public charging ports per 10,000 drivers)
  • Ninth in adoption rate (4.0% of light-duty vehicle registrations are for electric vehicles)
  • 14th in the percentage change in the adoption rate from 2021 to 2022 (27.0% increase)

Colorado has been an early adopter of electric vehicles. In 2013, the state started the Charge Ahead Colorado grant program to encourage the installation of electric vehicle charging stations. Additionally, in a 2018 plan, Colorado set a goal to have 940,000 EVs on the road by 2030.

3 states with the best vehicle infrastructure

Rank State Electric vehicle charging ports per 10,000 drivers Electric vehicle laws and incentives Electric vehicle adoption rate % change in electric vehicle adoption rate, 2021 to 2022
1 Colorado 9.4 102 4.0% 27.0%
2 New York 9.5 94 3.6% 27.8%
3 Massachusetts 12.8 90 4.4% 24.6%

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data. Note: The percentage change in the electric vehicle adoption rate is half-weighted, while the other data is fully weighted.

Following Colorado, New York ranks second. Breaking it down further, New York finishes:

  • Third in electric car laws and incentives, with 94
  • Fifth in the rate of charging ports (9.5 public charging ports per 10,000 drivers)
  • 11th in the percentage change in the adoption rate from 2021 to 2022 (27.8% increase)
  • 12th in adoption rate (3.6% of total light-duty vehicle registrations are for electric vehicles)

Massachusetts is third with the following rankings:

  • Third in the rate of charging ports (12.8 public charging ports per 10,000 drivers)
  • Fifth in electric car laws and incentives, with 90
  • Seventh in adoption rate (4.4% of total light-duty vehicle registrations are for electric vehicles)
  • 25th in the percentage change in the adoption rate from 2021 to 2022 (24.6% increase)

Notably, New York became the second state (behind California) to set a zero-emissions goal for vehicles by 2035. Meanwhile, Massachusetts set a 2050 zero-emissions goal.

Conversely, the states with the worst electric vehicle infrastructure are South Dakota, Kentucky and North Dakota.

Full rankings

Electric vehicle infrastructure by state

Rank State Electric vehicle charging ports per 10,000 drivers Electric vehicle laws and incentives Electric vehicle adoption rate % change in electric vehicle adoption rate, 2021 to 2022
N/A U.S. 6.3 2,640 3.4% 24.9%
1 Colorado 9.4 102 4.0% 27.0%
2 New York 9.5 94 3.6% 27.8%
3 Massachusetts 12.8 90 4.4% 24.6%
4 California 12.1 269 7.7% 20.5%
5 Washington 8.1 92 6.0% 24.1%
6 Vermont 15.8 67 4.6% 23.4%
7 Maryland 9.2 82 4.2% 23.5%
8 Oregon 7.8 76 5.5% 22.5%
9 New Jersey 4.8 70 3.6% 35.5%
10 Connecticut 7.4 80 3.4% 24.4%
11 Utah 7.2 47 3.6% 27.7%
12 Virginia 5.4 78 3.6% 23.6%
13 Nevada 7.4 37 4.0% 34.1%
14 District of Columbia 33.2 37 8.2% 18.8%
15 Florida 5.1 50 3.0% 30.3%
15 Arizona 5.3 59 3.7% 23.3%
17 Rhode Island 8.0 42 3.0% 25.4%
18 Hawaii 7.2 38 5.4% 22.1%
19 Delaware 5.5 38 3.0% 27.1%
19 North Carolina 4.4 62 2.7% 25.2%
21 Maine 8.5 40 3.2% 22.4%
22 Pennsylvania 4.2 42 2.7% 29.4%
23 Illinois 3.3 53 3.4% 25.0%
24 Minnesota 3.8 70 2.8% 22.5%
25 Michigan 3.8 62 2.1% 27.0%
26 Texas 3.5 55 2.2% 29.7%
27 Georgia 5.4 32 2.4% 26.3%
28 New Hampshire 4.0 36 3.1% 24.8%
29 Montana 3.8 25 2.2% 31.8%
30 Oklahoma 3.0 42 1.8% 37.7%
31 New Mexico 3.5 45 2.5% 20.5%
32 Missouri 4.8 20 2.3% 23.0%
33 Indiana 2.4 51 2.1% 21.4%
34 Wisconsin 2.5 42 2.4% 19.4%
35 Ohio 3.5 23 2.1% 23.6%
36 South Carolina 2.6 44 1.8% 23.2%
37 West Virginia 2.8 23 1.5% 30.6%
38 Arkansas 3.0 26 1.4% 26.3%
39 Alaska 2.1 18 2.1% 30.2%
40 Wyoming 3.7 17 1.3% 25.5%
41 Kansas 4.3 16 2.1% 19.6%
41 Idaho 2.4 17 2.4% 24.6%
43 Tennessee 3.1 18 1.9% 23.3%
44 Iowa 2.6 31 1.9% 19.6%
45 Alabama 2.0 28 1.3% 25.3%
46 Louisiana 1.7 21 1.1% 29.8%
47 Mississippi 1.5 24 1.0% 25.1%
48 Nebraska 2.8 15 1.8% 21.8%
49 North Dakota 2.6 16 1.0% 24.4%
50 Kentucky 2.0 17 1.7% 23.2%
51 South Dakota 2.4 17 1.3% 21.1%

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data. Notes: The percentage change in the electric vehicle adoption rate is half-weighted, while the other data is fully weighted. The U.S. laws and incentives tally includes federal laws.

Does electric vehicle infrastructure impact auto insurance rates?

Not necessarily, LendingTree auto insurance expert and licensed insurance agent Rob Bhatt says.

“Electric vehicle infrastructure has less impact on insurance rates than a particular vehicle’s crash rates and repair costs,” he says. “Electric vehicles generally have lower crash rates than gas-powered vehicles, but there are exceptions. About a decade ago, electric vehicles were considerably more expensive to repair or replace after an accident than gas-powered vehicles, making them more expensive to insure. Since then, the costs of fixing or replacing EVs has come down, and the price of insuring them is coming down to levels comparable to rates for gas cars.”

However, car insurance rates have risen dramatically over the past few years for other reasons. Still, Bhatt says there are signs that rates are now stabilizing.

Breaking down our infrastructure data points by category, the District of Columbia ranks first for public electric vehicle charging ports per 10,000 drivers at 33.2 — more than double the next state.

Laws and regulations may play a role here. The district requires new construction and renovation of commercial buildings or multiunit dwellings with on-site parking to reserve at least 20% of parking spaces for electric vehicle-charging infrastructure.

Meanwhile, Vermont has 15.8 charging outlets per 10,000 drivers — a distant second. Massachusetts (12.8) and California (12.1) are the only other states with more than 10.0 public outlets per 10,000 drivers.

3 states with the highest rate of electric vehicle charging ports

Rank State Electric vehicle charging station locations Electric vehicle charging ports Electric vehicle charging ports per 10,000 drivers
1 District of Columbia 338 1,059 33.2
2 Vermont 374 942 15.8
3 Massachusetts 2,876 6,915 12.8

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data. Note: The data is as of Feb. 20, 2024.

Comparatively, Mississippi has just 1.5 charging outlets per 10,000 drivers — the lowest across the U.S. Louisiana follows it at 1.7, the only other state below 2.0.

Full rankings

Highest rate of electric vehicle charging ports, by state

Rank State Electric vehicle charging station locations Electric vehicle charging ports Electric vehicle charging ports per 10,000 drivers
N/A U.S. 61,545 164,465 5.8
1 District of Columbia 338 1,059 33.2
2 Vermont 374 942 15.8
3 Massachusetts 2,876 6,915 12.8
4 California 15,663 43,766 12.1
5 New York 3,792 10,701 9.5
6 Colorado 2,096 5,085 9.4
7 Maryland 1,607 4,644 9.2
8 Maine 472 1,037 8.5
9 Washington 2,092 5,491 8.1
10 Rhode Island 295 696 8.0
11 Oregon 1,180 2,958 7.8
12 Connecticut 752 2,179 7.4
12 Nevada 569 1,870 7.4
14 Hawaii 351 774 7.2
14 Utah 872 2,172 7.2
16 Delaware 185 507 5.5
17 Georgia 1,933 5,157 5.4
17 Virginia 1,446 4,143 5.4
19 Arizona 1,182 3,439 5.3
20 Florida 3,228 9,156 5.1
21 Missouri 1,184 2,626 4.8
21 New Jersey 1,228 3,451 4.8
23 North Carolina 1,511 3,925 4.4
24 Kansas 517 1,119 4.3
25 Pennsylvania 1,670 4,251 4.2
26 New Hampshire 233 545 4.0
27 Michigan 1,395 3,218 3.8
27 Minnesota 772 1,945 3.8
27 Montana 125 375 3.8
30 Wyoming 94 239 3.7
31 New Mexico 284 671 3.5
31 Ohio 1,546 3,554 3.5
31 Texas 3,139 8,767 3.5
34 Illinois 1,250 3,309 3.3
35 Tennessee 832 1,992 3.1
36 Arkansas 309 800 3.0
36 Oklahoma 330 1,281 3.0
38 Nebraska 256 545 2.8
38 West Virginia 138 420 2.8
40 Iowa 346 798 2.6
40 North Dakota 95 205 2.6
40 South Carolina 512 1,304 2.6
43 Wisconsin 581 1,377 2.5
44 Idaho 179 455 2.4
44 Indiana 527 1,470 2.4
44 South Dakota 90 224 2.4
47 Alaska 61 119 2.1
48 Alabama 358 942 2.0
48 Kentucky 299 800 2.0
50 Louisiana 239 651 1.7
51 Mississippi 142 396 1.5

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data. Note: The data is as of Feb. 20, 2024.

As for the states with the most electric vehicle laws and initiatives, California ranks first, with 269.

The state’s ambitious zero-emissions initiative likely plays a role here. In California, 35% of new cars sold should be plug-in hybrid electric, electric or powered by hydrogen fuel cells by 2026, rising to 68% by 2030 and 100% by 2035. That makes it one of the most ambitious zero-emissions initiatives in the country.

The next highest state is Colorado, with 102 laws and incentives — the only other with at least 100. New York (94) rounds out the top three. While California and New York are among the top two most populous states, Colorado falls in the middle — making its high number of laws and incentives particularly impressive.

3 states with the most electric vehicle laws and incentives

Rank State Electric vehicle laws and incentives
1 California 269
2 Colorado 102
3 New York 94

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data. Note: The data is as of Feb. 20, 2024.

Conversely, Nebraska (15) has the fewest laws and incentives. Meanwhile, North Dakota and Kansas follow, at 16 each. Unlike the top-ranking states, those at the bottom have some of the lowest populations by state.

Full rankings

Electric vehicle laws and incentives, by state

Rank State Electric vehicle laws and incentives
N/A U.S. 2,648
1 California 269
2 Colorado 102
3 New York 94
4 Washington 92
5 Massachusetts 90
6 Maryland 82
7 Connecticut 80
8 Virginia 78
9 Oregon 76
10 Minnesota 70
10 New Jersey 70
12 Vermont 67
13 Michigan 62
13 North Carolina 62
15 Arizona 59
16 Texas 55
17 Illinois 53
18 Indiana 51
19 Florida 50
20 Utah 47
21 New Mexico 45
22 South Carolina 44
23 Oklahoma 42
23 Pennsylvania 42
23 Rhode Island 42
23 Wisconsin 42
27 Maine 40
28 Delaware 38
28 Hawaii 38
30 District of Columbia 37
30 Nevada 37
32 New Hampshire 36
33 Georgia 32
34 Iowa 31
35 Alabama 28
36 Arkansas 26
37 Montana 25
38 Mississippi 24
39 Ohio 23
39 West Virginia 23
41 Louisiana 21
42 Missouri 20
43 Alaska 18
43 Tennessee 18
45 Idaho 17
45 Kentucky 17
45 South Dakota 17
45 Wyoming 17
49 Kansas 16
49 North Dakota 16
51 Nebraska 15

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data. Notes: The U.S. laws and incentives tally includes federal laws. The data is as of Feb. 20, 2024.

When calculating the highest electric vehicle adoption rate (the total number of electric vehicle, plug-in hybrid and hybrid vehicle registrations divided by total light-duty vehicle registrations), the District of Columbia ranks first at 8.2%. Notably, the district allows new electric vehicles to be registered for a reduced fee of $36 for the first two years of registration.

D.C. is followed by California (7.7%) and Washington (6.0%).

3 states with the highest electric vehicle adoption rates

Rank State Electric vehicle registrations, 2022 Light-duty vehicle registrations, 2022 Electric vehicle adoption rate
1 District of Columbia 26,300 319,400 8.2%
2 California 2,778,700 36,119,800 7.7%
3 Washington 405,700 6,802,500 6.0%

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data.

Meanwhile, Mississippi and North Dakota tie for the lowest adoption rate, at 1.0% each.

As far as how that’s changed, the adoption rate grew just under a quarter (24.9%) in the U.S. between 2021 and 2022. Oklahoma saw the most growth by state, with the rate jumping 37.7% from 1.3% to 1.8%. New Jersey (35.5%) and Nevada (34.1%) saw the next largest increases.

States with the highest increases in electric vehicle adoption rates, 2021 to 2022

Rank State Electric vehicle adoption rate, 2021 Electric vehicle adoption rate, 2022 % change in electric vehicles adoption rate
1 Oklahoma 1.3% 1.8% 37.7%
2 New Jersey 2.6% 3.6% 35.5%
3 Nevada 3.0% 4.0% 34.1%

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data.

Comparatively, the District of Columbia (18.8%) saw the least growth during this period, followed by Wisconsin (19.4%) and Kansas and Iowa (tied at 19.6%).

Full rankings

Electric vehicle adoption rates, by state

Rank State Electric vehicle registrations, 2022 Light-duty vehicle registrations, 2022 Electric vehicle adoption rate
N/A U.S. 9,746,500 283,509,000 3.4%
1 District of Columbia 26,300 319,400 8.2%
2 California 2,778,700 36,119,800 7.7%
3 Washington 405,700 6,802,500 6.0%
4 Oregon 208,400 3,779,800 5.5%
5 Hawaii 58,000 1,080,500 5.4%
6 Vermont 27,300 595,000 4.6%
7 Massachusetts 238,500 5,422,300 4.4%
8 Maryland 215,200 5,066,800 4.2%
9 Colorado 215,700 5,387,100 4.0%
9 Nevada 100,800 2,520,700 4.0%
11 Arizona 237,000 6,490,500 3.7%
12 Virginia 276,700 7,642,100 3.6%
12 New Jersey 256,400 7,148,700 3.6%
12 Utah 107,500 2,997,500 3.6%
12 New York 404,100 11,306,300 3.6%
16 Connecticut 99,600 2,951,300 3.4%
16 Illinois 336,700 10,037,500 3.4%
18 Maine 39,600 1,222,000 3.2%
19 New Hampshire 42,900 1,373,700 3.1%
20 Florida 552,500 18,128,300 3.0%
20 Delaware 27,700 913,600 3.0%
20 Rhode Island 26,300 872,000 3.0%
23 Minnesota 141,500 5,053,400 2.8%
24 Pennsylvania 272,400 10,165,300 2.7%
24 North Carolina 239,700 8,970,300 2.7%
26 New Mexico 48,600 1,929,400 2.5%
27 Wisconsin 130,900 5,476,200 2.4%
27 Idaho 45,900 1,934,200 2.4%
27 Georgia 225,400 9,542,400 2.4%
30 Missouri 123,400 5,422,400 2.3%
31 Montana 22,100 999,600 2.2%
31 Texas 553,600 25,346,000 2.2%
33 Michigan 180,200 8,445,900 2.1%
33 Kansas 55,400 2,604,600 2.1%
33 Ohio 217,600 10,278,300 2.1%
33 Indiana 128,700 6,094,400 2.1%
33 Alaska 11,700 562,100 2.1%
38 Tennessee 124,900 6,422,600 1.9%
38 Iowa 59,700 3,118,200 1.9%
40 Nebraska 34,800 1,940,200 1.8%
40 Oklahoma 74,800 4,249,900 1.8%
40 South Carolina 87,000 4,944,700 1.8%
43 Kentucky 67,800 3,974,600 1.7%
44 West Virginia 21,600 1,488,900 1.5%
45 Arkansas 38,200 2,685,400 1.4%
46 Alabama 63,900 4,795,500 1.3%
46 South Dakota 12,500 945,100 1.3%
46 Wyoming 8,300 644,400 1.3%
49 Louisiana 40,200 3,792,200 1.1%
50 North Dakota 7,800 785,500 1.0%
50 Mississippi 26,300 2,719,900 1.0%

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data.

% change in electric vehicle adoption rate by state

Rank State Electric vehicle adoption rate, 2021 Electric vehicle adoption rate, 2022 % change in electric vehicles adoption rate
N/A U.S. 2.8% 3.4% 24.9%
1 Oklahoma 1.3% 1.8% 37.7%
2 New Jersey 2.6% 3.6% 35.5%
3 Nevada 3.0% 4.0% 34.1%
4 Montana 1.7% 2.2% 31.8%
5 West Virginia 1.1% 1.5% 30.6%
6 Florida 2.3% 3.0% 30.3%
7 Alaska 1.6% 2.1% 30.2%
8 Louisiana 0.8% 1.1% 29.8%
9 Texas 1.7% 2.2% 29.7%
10 Pennsylvania 2.1% 2.7% 29.4%
11 New York 2.8% 3.6% 27.8%
12 Utah 2.8% 3.6% 27.7%
13 Delaware 2.4% 3.0% 27.1%
14 Colorado 3.2% 4.0% 27.0%
14 Michigan 1.7% 2.1% 27.0%
16 Arkansas 1.1% 1.4% 26.3%
16 Georgia 1.9% 2.4% 26.3%
18 Wyoming 1.0% 1.3% 25.5%
19 Rhode Island 2.4% 3.0% 25.4%
20 Alabama 1.1% 1.3% 25.3%
21 North Carolina 2.1% 2.7% 25.2%
22 Mississippi 0.8% 1.0% 25.1%
23 Illinois 2.7% 3.4% 25.0%
24 New Hampshire 2.5% 3.1% 24.8%
25 Idaho 1.9% 2.4% 24.6%
25 Massachusetts 3.5% 4.4% 24.6%
27 Connecticut 2.7% 3.4% 24.4%
27 North Dakota 0.8% 1.0% 24.4%
29 Washington 4.8% 6.0% 24.1%
30 Ohio 1.7% 2.1% 23.6%
30 Virginia 2.9% 3.6% 23.6%
32 Maryland 3.4% 4.2% 23.5%
33 Vermont 3.7% 4.6% 23.4%
34 Arizona 3.0% 3.7% 23.3%
34 Tennessee 1.6% 1.9% 23.3%
36 Kentucky 1.4% 1.7% 23.2%
36 South Carolina 1.4% 1.8% 23.2%
38 Missouri 1.8% 2.3% 23.0%
39 Minnesota 2.3% 2.8% 22.5%
39 Oregon 4.5% 5.5% 22.5%
41 Maine 2.6% 3.2% 22.4%
42 Hawaii 4.4% 5.4% 22.1%
43 Nebraska 1.5% 1.8% 21.8%
44 Indiana 1.7% 2.1% 21.4%
45 South Dakota 1.1% 1.3% 21.1%
46 California 6.4% 7.7% 20.5%
46 New Mexico 2.1% 2.5% 20.5%
48 Iowa 1.6% 1.9% 19.6%
48 Kansas 1.8% 2.1% 19.6%
50 Wisconsin 2.0% 2.4% 19.4%
51 District of Columbia 6.9% 8.2% 18.8%

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data.

Because electric vehicles are considered better for the environment, it may not be surprising that only 13 states have experienced an increase in their carbon dioxide emissions since 2012.

There are some emissions concerns related to electric vehicles — for example, if the electricity that charges an EV comes from fossil fuels, it’ll produce carbon dioxide. However, even in areas where electricity is primarily generated by coal, driving electric is still one-third less polluting than driving a gasoline-powered car, according to the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy.

By state, Idaho (29.7%) saw the biggest increase in carbon dioxide emissions between 2012 and 2021. That’s more than 20 percentage points higher than the next highest state, Washington (8.7%). Idaho’s low electric vehicle adoption rate (2.4%) likely plays a role here. Additionally, about 25% of Idaho’s electricity generation is fueled by natural gas, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, which may also contribute to carbon dioxide emissions — even among electric vehicle drivers.

States with biggest % change in carbon dioxide emissions

Rank State Million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, 2012 Million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, 2021 % change in emissions, 2012-2021
1 Idaho 15.8 20.5 29.7%
2 Washington 67.9 73.8 8.7%
3 Alaska 36.2 38.9 7.5%

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) carbon dioxide emissions data.

Conversely, Kentucky saw the biggest decrease in emissions at 20.8%, followed by Wyoming (18.1%) and Oklahoma (16.1%).

Nationally, carbon dioxide emissions fell 6.1% from 2012 to 2021.

Full rankings

% change in carbon dioxide emissions, by state

Rank State Million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, 2012 Million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, 2021 % change in emissions, 2012-2021
N/A U.S. 5,229.6 4,911.2 -6.1%
1 Idaho 15.8 20.5 29.7%
2 Washington 67.9 73.8 8.7%
3 Alaska 36.2 38.9 7.5%
4 Connecticut 34.3 36.6 6.7%
5 Texas 627.1 663.5 5.8%
6 Mississippi 60.1 63.1 5.0%
7 Oregon 36.7 38.5 4.9%
8 Nevada 37.9 39.4 4.0%
9 South Dakota 14.9 15.2 2.0%
10 Vermont 5.5 5.6 1.8%
10 Wisconsin 90.9 92.5 1.8%
12 Rhode Island 10.5 10.6 1.0%
13 Utah 61.6 62.1 0.8%
14 Florida 227 226.3 -0.3%
15 North Dakota 56.7 56.5 -0.4%
16 Virginia 98.6 98 -0.6%
17 Minnesota 86.4 83.2 -3.7%
18 District of Columbia 2.6 2.5 -3.8%
19 West Virginia 92.2 88.4 -4.1%
20 Louisiana 197.1 188.6 -4.3%
21 Michigan 155.4 147.8 -4.9%
22 Colorado 91.2 85.4 -6.4%
22 Tennessee 99 92.7 -6.4%
24 Arkansas 66.3 62 -6.5%
25 Nebraska 50.6 47.2 -6.7%
26 South Carolina 74.5 69.3 -7.0%
27 New York 167.9 156 -7.1%
27 California 348.8 324 -7.1%
27 North Carolina 124.5 115.6 -7.1%
30 Montana 30.8 28.5 -7.5%
31 Maine 15.6 14.4 -7.7%
32 Missouri 129.1 117 -9.4%
33 New Hampshire 14.7 13.3 -9.5%
33 Kansas 66.1 59.8 -9.5%
35 Ohio 214.9 194 -9.7%
36 New Jersey 99 89.1 -10.0%
37 Iowa 81.4 73.1 -10.2%
37 Massachusetts 62.5 56.1 -10.2%
39 Delaware 14.6 13 -11.0%
39 Pennsylvania 239.8 213.5 -11.0%
41 Alabama 122.6 108.4 -11.6%
42 Georgia 141.6 124.1 -12.4%
43 Arizona 95.5 83 -13.1%
44 Hawaii 20.3 17.3 -14.8%
44 Indiana 195.4 166.4 -14.8%
46 New Mexico 54.2 45.9 -15.3%
47 Maryland 62.4 52.6 -15.7%
48 Illinois 219 184.2 -15.9%
49 Oklahoma 104.7 87.8 -16.1%
50 Wyoming 66.7 54.6 -18.1%
51 Kentucky 140.6 111.3 -20.8%

Source: LendingTree analysis of U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) carbon dioxide emissions data.

While infrastructure doesn’t affect your insurance rates, it’s worth considering your area’s electric vehicle infrastructure before purchasing an electric car to minimize pain points. Bhatt recommends the following:

  • Be aware that changing adoption rates and innovations will affect insurance rates. “Since the crash rates and repair costs for electric vehicles are still evolving, how insurance companies insure them is likely to also continue to evolve,” he says.
  • Weigh the costs and benefits of switching from gas. “While ditching gas is undeniably cheaper, it may take extra effort to recharge your car,” Bhatt says. “This is almost a cultural shift. We’re so used to refilling our fuel tanks at the closest gas station that we rarely think about it, other than when our tank gets low in a remote area.”
  • Be aware of electric vehicle depreciation rates. “These cars tend to depreciate quicker than gas cars for a couple of reasons,” he says. “One is the concern over battery life. Also, price reductions for new electric vehicles have lowered the resale prices of older electric vehicles. If your car is totaled, the insurance company only has to pay you its market, or resale, value, which may be considerably less than what you paid.”

LendingTree researchers analyzed U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center data to create electric vehicle infrastructure rankings by state, utilizing a composite scoring system.

Categories evaluated included:

  • The amount of electric vehicle charging ports per 10,000 drivers in each state (as of Feb. 20, 2024)
  • The amount of government laws and incentives in each state related to electric vehicles (as of Feb. 20, 2024)
  • The electric vehicle adoption rate in each state (as of 2022)
  • The percentage change in the electric vehicle adoption rate in each state from 2021 to 2022

The states were ranked individually in each category, and these rankings were added to create a composite score.

To determine the number of electric vehicle charging ports per 10,000 drivers, a state’s number of charging ports was divided by the state’s number of light-duty vehicle registrations. The result was then multiplied by 10,000.

The number of electric vehicle laws and incentives was calculated by adding the total in each state across four electric vehicle categories:

  • Electric
  • Plug-in hybrid
  • Hybrid
  • Neighborhood

To determine adoption rates, we added a state’s electric, plug-in hybrid and hybrid electric vehicle registrations and divided them by the state’s total light-duty vehicle registration count. We did the same for 2021 and 2022, and then calculated the percentage change between the two.

Separately, researchers evaluated changes in carbon dioxide emissions (measured in million metric tons) between 2012 and 2021, via the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Source

This article originally appeared on LendingTree and was syndicated by MediaFeed.

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