March Sadness: The escapist book bracket the world needs right now

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Apocalypse, heartbreak and revenge … oh my?

Chicago’s Women & Children First Bookstore is hosting the ultimate escapist “March Sadness” book bracket for anyone looking to escape their daily doom scrolling. Starting March 9, you can vote for your favorite book by heading over to the feminist bookstore’s Facebook or Instagram.

The bracket is split into four categories: apocalypse, escapism, revenge and heartbreak. You’ll first be able to vote for your favorite book in each of the four categories. The apocalypse winner will square up against the escapist winner for a spot in the final. Likewise, voters’ favorite revenge book will compete against the heartbreak winner.

Feel like following along at home? You can find a printable bracket and a full list of competing books on the Women & Children First Bookstore Facebook page. The bookstore’s followers could submit their brackets in person or online to win prizes. Those winners will be announced April 1.

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As Women & Children First Bookstore say in their post, “May the odds be ever in your favorite book’s favor!”

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This article was produced and syndicated by MediaFeed.org.

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Kaitlyn Farley

Kaitlyn Farley is MediaFeed’s writer/editor. She is a masters of science in journalism candidate at Northwestern University, specializing in social justice and investigative reporting. She has worked at various radio stations and newsrooms, covering higher-education, local politics, natural disasters and investigative and watchdog stories related to Title IX and transparency issues.