Why do creepy dolls keep washing up on Texas beaches?

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Something weird is happening in Texas.

Ok, you’re right. There is always a ton of weird stuff happening in Texas. It’s just kind of a weird place, but there is something very strange happening at Texas beaches, and this time I’m not referring to the chocolate milk colored water along our little stretch of the Gulf of Mexico. I’m talking about something really creepy — scary baby dolls.

They are washing up on our shores like we requested old toy donations from the merfolk.

Yes, Texas is being invaded by super scary, barnacle encrusted, tattered and battered dolls. The shoreline where this is happening is part of the Mission Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve, run by the University of Texas Marine Science Institute, where many real and legit sea creatures that don’t want to harm us in our dreams, are monitored and studied. There is no official Creepy Barnacle Encrusted Babydoll course of study at this time. It’s just a random perk, reserve staff say.

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And what does the research center do with the recovered terrifying dolls? Well, first they post them on the reserve’s Facebook page  (under Mission Aransas Reserve), then they sell them off as a fundraiser. There is apparently a market for barnacle babies, but all proceeds go to help out living adorable sea creatures like sea turtles.

Please note just the head of a barnacle baby sold for $35. That’s a lot of sea turtle chow!

Check out the video from the reserve’s YouTube channel:

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