15 herbs to use when you’re out of oregano

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A staple in Italian and Greek cuisine, oregano is what your food needs for extra flavor.

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While oregano can be used both fresh and dry, both have a distinct taste, intensity, and flavor. Fresh oregano has a stronger, sharper, more intense flavor, while dry oregano has a more potent aroma.

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If your recipe calls for oregano, don’t fret! There are so many ways to replicate its aroma.

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Marjoram

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Add marjoram toward the end of cooking so you don’t lose its aroma, as this herb doesn’t maintain its flavor when cooked for too long. Use it in meats, beans, legumes, vegetables, stews, and sauces.

Fresh Thyme

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Thyme is ideal for dressings, meats (especially white meat), fish, stews, potatoes, veggies, beans, tomato-based foods. Just like oregano, thyme can hold its flavors during cooking, so you can use it in pizza and pasta sauces that need to cook for a longer time.

Basil (Fresh or Dry)

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Basil is mild, delicate, subtle, sweet, floral, and it lacks the pungent, earthy, bitterness that oregano has. But it can replace it in recipes, as long as you add a bigger quantity to obtain the same taste.

Parsley

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Parsley is gentler, while oregano has more of a sharp kick. It lacks the earthiness, bitterness, and pungent note of the piny-minty freshness you get with oregano, but it can be a good replacement.

Sage

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This herb has a citrusy vibe and a certain minty-piny freshness, a flavor that reminds you of eucalyptus. Sage packs quite the flavor.

Italian Seasoning, and dill

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It’s more likely you’ll have dill in your pantry. While its profile differs from oregano, it can be a good replacement. Dill also has an intense aroma, and a complex one, and you may notice that its taste reminds you of anise.

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