Homebuyers: How to tell if you’re moving into a good neighborhood

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In today’s hypercompetitive housing market, buyers don’t have a lot of leverage. Many prospective buyers, facing rising interest rates and tightened loan requirements, have gotten creative — looking at distressed properties to find a deal, or working with a low-commission real estate agent so they can put a few more dollars into their down payment.

 

But in your rush to find a home that you can afford, it’s important to look at the neighborhood, too. A home’s neighborhood is arguably as important as the property itself regarding your future satisfaction. And the stakes are high! One recent study found that 70% of recent home buyers had regrets about their purchases.

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So how do you evaluate a neighborhood? Several factors will determine how “at home” you feel in your new home. Let’s look at 22 of the most important ones!

1. An Acceptable Noise Level

The amount of ambient noise can have a huge influence on your quality of life in a new home. Make sure you visit a prospective area at different times, and on different days. If you only go to an open house on a Sunday morning, just be aware that you might have visited during the quietest period of the entire week. There could be a beer garden, commuter train, or music venue down the street that changes the entire character of the neighborhood for the rest of the week.

 

Just like you wouldn’t sell a house without doing a comparative market analysis, you should never buy a house without checking it out multiple times and days.

2. Shopping Options

It’s not ideal to have to get in your car and drive twenty minutes every time you want a coffee or a gallon of milk. Think about the things that you buy every day, or very often, and check to see if there are nearby places where you can get them. Think grocery stores, pharmacies, department stores, and the like. Are they within a walkable distance? What are their hours? Do you have a wide selection, or will you be forced to go to the same place every time?

3. Sidewalks

Sidewalks might sound like something you can take for granted, but there are a lot of neighborhoods that don’t have any sidewalks, often by design. Neighborhoods without sidewalks often have very low community cohesion and trust and tend to be unsafe for people who do attempt to walk around.

 

High walkability is also associated with higher home values, and you can’t have walkability without sidewalks. Accessibility is also important if you or your loved ones ever need to get around by wheelchair. Bottom line: good neighborhoods have sidewalks.

4. Emergency Services Close By

Where is the nearest emergency room or fire department? While everyone hopes they won’t need those services, being able to call on them when you need to can literally be life-saving. Especially if you’re older or have a medical condition, it’s important to be able to get to a quality hospital in minutes.

 

The same applies to the fire department. If you have to wait thirty minutes (or more) for the fire department to get to your house, you don’t have much fire protection.

5. A Short Commute

Shorter commutes are associated with more job satisfaction and a higher quality of life. So when you’re looking at a neighborhood, honestly assess how long it’s going to take you to get to and from work. If you aren’t sure you want to drive, look at mass transit options like light rail or buses. The average commute in the U.S. is around a half hour so be wary about exceeding that too much.

6. Trees

Trees are nice to look at, but they’re also associated with higher levels of life satisfaction. One study found that people who lived in neighborhoods with more trees were less likely to be on antidepressants than people who lived in treeless neighborhoods. While there are a lot of factors at work here, it’s a general rule that the more trees there are in a neighborhood, the better it is.

7. A Compatible Vibe

Are you compatible with the culture of the neighborhood? If you’re a young family with kids, you’ll likely want to live in a lively neighborhood with lots of other parents and young children. On the other hand, if you’re a retiree, you may find a neighborhood with a lot of kids to be a little too loud and hectic. If you’re a young single professional, you probably want to live around other young professionals, not in a retiree-heavy neighborhood.

 

If you’re working with a seasoned agent from a company like Clever Real Estate, they can advise you on where you might fit in. As much as any other single factor, cultural compatibility will determine how happy you are in your new neighborhood.

8. Exercise and Fitness Options

Parks, fitness centers, and sports amenities like basketball courts and soccer fields don’t just provide open green space and places for community gathering — studies have shown that their proximity can make it more likely that you get in your workouts. The upshot is that the closer you live to somewhere you can exercise, the healthier you’ll be.

9. Safety

Study local crime rates, and compare them to similar neighborhoods across the city. Don’t rely too heavily on crime rates, though, as these kinds of statistics are often manipulated or skewed by underreporting (or even overreporting). The best way to determine the level of crime in a neighborhood is to talk to the people who live there. Ask neighbors or people walking around if they’ve experienced any problems with crime in the neighborhood, and if so, what the police response has been.

10. Does It Feel Safe?

This is a slightly different question than if the neighborhood is safe. While crime rates tell an objective (though often incomplete) story about how much crime is present in a neighborhood, the on-the-ground feel of the neighborhood can also have a big impact on how safe you feel. Is the neighborhood well-lit? Are there abandoned homes or vehicles around? Is there a neighborhood watch association where neighbors look out for each other? Do you feel welcomed?

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2. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now.

11. Good Schools

If you have kids, it’s a no-brainer that you’ll be looking closely at the local schools. Check out test scores, sports programs, other extracurricular activities, the local curriculum, and school programming, as well as if there’s an active PTA or PTO. As with crime, the best way to assess the local schools is to visit them in person and talk to the parents of children who attend the school. Most schools have a Facebook group for parents that you’ll probably be able to join.

 

Even if you don’t have kids, you should still take a look at the schools in the neighborhood. High-quality schools are strongly associated with higher home values, so living near a good school means better appreciation and an easier resale in the future.

12. Dining Options

You probably won’t want to cook every single night, so having a few affordable, appealing dining options close to your home is a big plus. Bonus points if they’re within walking distance!

13. The Local Property Tax Rate

Property taxes can be a significant annual expense, especially if you’re moving to an area with elevated property values. You’ll want to calculate your future property tax bill just like you probably calculated your real estate commission. Also, look at recent property tax trends — have they been steeply increasing, or are they fairly stable?

14. The Homeowner’s Association Rules and Fees

If you move into an area governed by a homeowner’s association, you’ll be subject to fairly strict rules about your home and its appearance. If you want a lot of freedom to alter your home’s features and look, you may not be happy living under the authority of an HOA.

You’ll also be responsible for paying HOA fees, which can be significant. These aren’t optional, and in some places, the HOA can even foreclose on you for unpaid fees!

15. Miscellaneous Amenities

All kinds of little neighborhood features may not fall into a particular category, but that could potentially have a huge impact on your quality of life. Amenities like public libraries, music lessons for children, swimming pools or bodies of water, dog parks, tennis courts, sports fields, bike and hiking trails, movie theaters, coffee shops, art galleries, nightlife, and social clubs can all be big difference-makers when it comes to picking a place to live.

16. Foreclosures

In this hot market, a lot of buyers are looking at unconventional options like off-market properties and foreclosures. A neighborhood with a lot of foreclosures is likely very affordable, but be wary of assuming that this kind of neighborhood is a sure thing for future appreciation. If a neighborhood is hit with a lot of foreclosures, falling home values can trigger lower property taxes, which then leads to cuts in public services — and that can have a dramatic dampening effect on a neighborhood’s eventual resurgence.

17. “For Rent” Signs

A lot of “For Rent” signs aren’t necessarily a bad sign — renters are often just as conscientious as homeowners. But they are an indication that community cohesion might not be as high in that neighborhood as it would be in an area with most owners. Many renters are only staying in one place temporarily, repairing their credit score or debt-to-income ratio so they can buy a place. As soon as they’re able to leave, they will. It can be hard to build a tight, trusting community when new people are moving in every year!

18. Development Plans

While a neighborhood might be ideal today, there’s no guarantee it’ll stay that way. Check with your local planning office and on local real estate sites to see what kind of projects are in the works for the neighborhood. That sedate, open neighborhood with lots of trees could change quickly if a developer decides to put in a new subdivision next door, or if the city wants to put a new highway through.

 

Then again, some new projects can boost home values. If a subway or light rail station is going to be built nearby, or a local commercial strip is set to be revamped, buying a property in the neighborhood could be a great investment.

19. Lot Characteristics

Once you’ve found a particular property you like, zoom in and think about the lot it sits on. Is it a larger corner lot? Is it near a major traffic route, or in a cul de sac? If the adjacent lots are currently vacant, they probably won’t always be — what seems like a private lot in open space now could seem cramped when there are new homes on either side. If you’re closing a sale in Florida, is your lot in a flood-prone location? The type of lot your home sits on will have a big effect on your living experience and eventual resale.

20. The Direction of Neighborhood Growth

Neighborhood evolution generally follows a consistent pattern; as one area develops, and prices go up, many residents and businesses decamp to an adjacent neighborhood, where home values are lower, and there’s room for more development. Once that area is built up, and home values rise, they move on to the next area, and so on.

 

Whether you call this redevelopment or gentrification, it’s smart to understand where you fit into this dynamic. Looking at a price map on a site like Redfin can suggest your neighborhood’s future. If your neighborhood is squarely in the path of the wave, you know that you have a good chance of seeing rapidly appreciating home values — and maybe of being priced out or finding yourself living in a neighborhood that’s a lot different than the one you moved into. On the other hand, if you’re out of the way, you can count on a more stable future — but one that might be less lucrative.

21. Strange Sounds and Smells

While this might sound weird, many communities are known for having weird sounds or odors. For example, much of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is notorious for smelling weird, thanks to a cereal plant and a sewage treatment facility.

 

Other neighborhoods may be near airports or industrial areas that produce a lot of loud noises, which can interfere with your sleep, and tank your home values. In some cases, entire towns can be plagued by unexplainable sounds. Make sure you visit a neighborhood at different times and on different days to ensure you don’t sign up for something you didn’t bargain for!

22. Know Your Wants and Must-Haves

Everyone goes into a home search with a wish list of neighborhood trails and amenities. But nearly everyone has to compromise on that wish list, especially in a hot seller’s market, and especially if you’re a first-time home buyer.

To avoid serious buyer’s remorse down the line, sort the items on your wish list into two categories: wants and must-haves. Must-haves are non-negotiable necessities; for example, if you have children, good schools would be a must-have. Anywhere you move would have to have those characteristics.

 

In the other group, put your wants. This will include items like dining options, certain amenities, new construction, and other features that you can live without.

 

As you search for a neighborhood and a home, make sure you prioritize your must-haves and stay flexible on your wants.

 

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This article originally appeared on Anytimeestimate.com and was syndicated by MediaFeed.org.

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Home foreclosure rates are on the rise in these states

 

While foreclosures are down overall compared to June, a number of states saw an increase in foreclosure starts in July. This is likely due to these states needing to play catch-up as they begin to process foreclosures on loans that were delinquent prior to the pandemic. The overall rate of foreclosure filings decreased by a little over 4% between June and July, which is either a typical Q3 seasonal drop or an indicator that foreclosure starts are beginning to fall off, as the experts at ATTOM Data Solutions have been predicting.

 

The number of U.S. properties with foreclosure filings in July was 30,358, according to ATTOM Data Solutions. This is up over 143% from a year ago when foreclosures were at historic lows due to federal government and mortgage servicing industry pandemic protections.

 

As the median home sale price cooled a bit from its record high in June of $413,800 to $403,800 in July, sales of existing homes also slowed for the sixth consecutive month, most likely due to mortgage rates rising as high as 6%.

 

However, higher mortgage rates notwithstanding, the median sales price for a home is still close to 11% higher than a year ago, partly as a result of ongoing tight inventory. This is making home ownership unaffordable for many, as wage gains – especially for low and middle-income level workers – are unable to keep pace with home price increases.

 

Read on for the foreclosure rates in July 2022 – plus the five counties with the highest rates within those states.

 

Related: The safest cities in the US

 

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As noted, foreclosure rates are down from last month, but up significantly compared to last year. Read on for July foreclosure rates for all 50 states — plus the District of Columbia — beginning with the state that had the lowest rate of foreclosure filings per housing unit.

 

 

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Ranking in population between Vermont and Alaska, the country’s 49th and 48th least populated states, Washington, D.C. had 16 foreclosures in June. With a total of 350,364 housing units, Washington, D.C.’s foreclosure rate was one in every 21,898 households, putting it in between the states of North Dakota (#48) and West Virginia (#47).

 

 

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South Dakota nabbed the 50th spot in July once again. Having 389,921 total housing units, the fifth least populated state had a foreclosure rate of one in every 55,703 households with seven foreclosures. Only four counties saw foreclosures. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Butte, Codington, Minnehaha, and Pennington.

 

 

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In 49th place for population, Vermont claimed the 49th spot for its foreclosure rate. Of Vermont’s 334,318 housing units, seven homes went into foreclosure at a rate of one in every 47,760 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Grand Isle, Rutland, Addison, Bennington, and Washington.

 

 

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North Dakota’s foreclosure rate was one in every 20,591 homes for the second month in a row. That puts the fourth least populated state – with 370,642 housing units and 18 foreclosures — in 48th place. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Morton, Pembina, Ward, Stark, and Cass.

 

 

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The 39th most populated state, West Virginia, ranked 47th once again. It has 855,635 homes, of which 51 went into foreclosure. That means the foreclosure rate was one in every 16,777 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Tyler, Cabell, Wayne, Marion, and Wetzel.

 

 

 

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The 44th most populated state took the 46th spot. With 33 foreclosures out of 514,803 housing units, its foreclosure rate was one in every 15,600 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Mineral, Dawson, Powell, Roosevelt, and ​​Big Horn.

 

 

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Ranked 13th for most populated state, Washington came in 45th place again for highest foreclosure rate. It has 3,202,241 housing units, of which 231 went into foreclosure, making the state’s foreclosure rate one in every 13,863 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Grays Harbor, Lincoln, Skamania, San Juan, and Island.

 

 

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With a total 1,994,323 housing units, Kentucky saw 158 homes go into foreclosure. That put the foreclosure rate for the 26th most populated state at one in every 12,622 households and in 44th place for the second month in a row. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Greenup, Hardin, Hancock, Martin, and Estill.

 

 

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Kansas took the 43rd spot. With 1,275,689 homes and a total of 110 housing units going into foreclosure, the 35th most-populated state’s foreclosure rate was one in every 11,597 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Sumner, Stevens, Brown, Geary, and Mcpherson.

 

 

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The eighth least populated state took the 42nd spot for highest foreclosure rate. A total of 43 homes went into foreclosure out of 483,474 total housing units, making the foreclosure rate for the Ocean State one in every 11,244 households. Only four counties saw foreclosures. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Newport, Providence, Kent, and Washington.

 

 

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The 38th most populated state, Idaho had 67 homes go into foreclosure. With 751,859 total housing units, the state’s foreclosure rate was one in every 11,222 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Payette, Shoshone, Benewah, Boundary, and Bonneville.

 

Recommended: Tips on Buying a Foreclosed Home

 

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Ranked 33rd for most populated state, Arkansas took the 40th spot for highest foreclosure rate. It has 1,365,265 housing units, of which 126 went into foreclosure, making the state’s latest foreclosure rate one in every 10,835 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Bradley, Ouachita, Crittenden, Lee, and White.

 

 

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The 27th most populated state ranked 39th for highest foreclosure rate. Of Oregon’s 1,813,747 homes, 191 went into foreclosure, making for a foreclosure rate of one in every 9,496 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Lake, Columbia, Linn, Morrow, and Douglas.

 

 

 

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In Tennessee, the 16th most populated state, there were 350 foreclosures out of 3,031,605 housing units. That put the foreclosure rate at one in every 8,662 homes and in the 38th spot once again. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Roane, Haywood, Grundy, Polk, and Cheatham.

 

 

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With 325 foreclosures out of 2,727,726 total housing units, Wisconsin, the 20th most populated state, had a foreclosure rate of one in every 8,393 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Ashland, Marinette, Walworth, Juneau, and Langlade.

 

 

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Alaska saw 38 foreclosures, making the foreclosure rate one in every 8,356 homes. That caused the third least populated state, with a total of 317,524 housing units, to take the 36th spot. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Matanuska-Susitna, Anchorage, Juneau, Fairbanks North Star, and Kenai Peninsula.

 

 

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In Mississippi, the 34th most populated state, there were 159 foreclosures out of 1,319,945 housing units. That put the foreclosure rate at one in every 8,302 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Clay, Jefferson, Prentiss, Claiborne, and Harrison.

 

 

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The 12th most populated state ranked 34th for highest foreclosure rate, with 443 homes going into foreclosure. Having 3,618,247 total housing units, the state saw a foreclosure rate of one in every 8,168 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Norton City, Hopewell City, Nottoway, Lexington City, and Gloucester.

 

 

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The 41st most populated state, New Hampshire, ranked 33rd for highest foreclosure rate. Of 638,795 homes, 80 went into foreclosure, making for a foreclosure rate of one in every 7,985 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Strafford, Rockingham, Cheshire, Grafton, and Sullivan.

 

 

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The 36th most populated state took the 32nd spot for highest foreclosure rate. Of its 940,859 homes, 130 went into foreclosure, making for a foreclosure rate of one in every 7,237 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Torrance, Socorro, Otero, Valencia and Bernalillo.

 

 

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The 19th most populated state, Missouri came in 31st for highest rate of foreclosures. Of its 2,786,621 homes, 387 went into foreclosure, making for a foreclosure rate of one in every 7,201 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Webster, Phelps, Henry, Sullivan, and Scott.

 

Recommended: What Is a Short Sale?

 

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The 15th most populated state ranked 30th for highest foreclosure rate. Of Massachusetts’ 2,998,537 housing units, 462 went into foreclosure, making for a foreclosure rate of one in every 6,490 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Berkshire, Hampden, Plymouth, Worcester, and Franklin.

 

 

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Ranked the least populated state in the country, Wyoming claimed the 29th spot for highest foreclosure rate. With 271,887 housing units, of which 42 went into foreclosure, the state’s foreclosure rate was one in every 6,474 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Carbon, Campbell, Washakie, Lincoln, and Crook.

 

 

 

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Ranked 37th for population, Nebraska claimed the 28th spot with a foreclosure rate of one in every 6,445 homes. With a total 844,278 housing units, the state had 131 foreclosure filings. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Dundy, Morrill, Hamilton, Burt, and Webster.

 

 

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Utah placed 27th for highest foreclosure rate. Of the Beehive State’s 1,151,414 housing units, 180 homes went into foreclosure, making the 30th most-populated state’s foreclosure rate one in every 6,397 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Sevier, Box Elder, Juab, Duchesne, and Tooele.

 

 

 

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Ranked 22nd for most populated state, Minnesota took the 26th spot for highest foreclosure rate. It has 2,485,558 housing units, of which 390 went into foreclosure, making the state’s foreclosure rate one in every 6,373 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Isanti, Chisago, Mille Lacs, Faribault, and Morrison.

 

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Pennsylvania had the 25th highest foreclosure rate once again. The fifth most populated state had a total of 907 housing units out of 5,742,828 homes go into foreclosure, making the state’s foreclosure rate one in every 6,332 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Delaware, Venango, Philadelphia, Schuylkill and Greene.

 

 

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In Arizona, the 14th most populated state, there were 489 foreclosures out of 3,082,000 housing units. That put the foreclosure rate at one in every 6,303 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Graham, Yuma, Cochise, Pinal, and Pima.

 

 

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The 21st most populated state ranked 23rd for highest foreclosure rate. Of Colorado’s 2,491,404 housing units, 402 went into foreclosure, making for a foreclosure rate of one in every 6,198 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Lake, Elbert, Moffat, Morgan, and Otero.

 

 

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Oklahoma claimed the 22nd spot. With housing units totaling 1,746,807, the 28th most populated state saw 326 homes go into foreclosure at a rate of one in every 5,358 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Washita, Harmon, Kingfisher, Canadian, and Ottawa.

 

 

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The ninth most populated state took 21st place for highest foreclosure rate. Out of 4,708,710 homes, 902 went into foreclosure. That put the Tar Heel State’s foreclosure rate at one in every 5,220 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Camden, Gates, Cumberland, Pasquotank, and Columbus.

 

Recommended: 4 Signs You May Be Ready to Buy

 

 

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Ranked as the ninth least populated state, Maine placed 20th for highest foreclosure rate. With a total of 739,072 housing units, the Pine Tree State saw 143 foreclosures for a foreclosure rate of one in every 5,168 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Somerset, Aroostook, Washington, Piscataquis, and Waldo.

 

 

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The Lone Star State saw 2,254 foreclosures. With a foreclosure rate of one in every 5142 households, this put the second most populous state with 11,589,324 housing units into the 19th spot. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Liberty, Cochran, Carson, Reagan, and Freestone.

 

 

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With 1,654 out of a total 8,488,066 housing units going into foreclosure, the fourth most populated state took the 18th spot. New York’s foreclosure rate was one in every 5,132 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Schoharie, Suffolk, Washington, Nassau, and Orleans.

 

 

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Ranked 25th for population, Louisiana took the 17th spot, with 406 homes out of a total of 2,073,200 housing units going into foreclosure. That means Louisiana had a foreclosure rate of one in every 5,106 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): West Baton Rouge, Tangipahoa, Lafayette, Iberville, and Beauregard.

 

 

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The 40th most populated state, Hawaii, came in 16th for highest foreclosure rate. Of 561,066 homes, 115 went into foreclosure, making for a foreclosure rate of one in every 4,879 households. Only four counties in the state had foreclosures. They were (from highest to lowest): Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and, Kauai.

 

 

 

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The eighth most populated state, Georgia ranked 15th for highest foreclosure rate. Of its 4,410,956 homes, 932 were foreclosed on. That put the state’s foreclosure rate at one in every 4,733 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Wayne, Glascock, Wilkinson, Long, and Madison.

 

 

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Ranked 24th for most populated, Alabama came in 14th for highest foreclosure rate. Of its 2,288,330 homes, 503 went into foreclosure, making for a foreclosure rate of one in every 4,549 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Conecuh, Bullock, Jefferson, Mobile, and Calhoun.

 

 

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The country’s most populated state ranked 13th for highest foreclosure rate. Of its 14,392,140 housing units, 3,492 went into foreclosure, making California’s foreclosure rate one in every 4,121 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Trinity, Yuba, Siskiyou, Kern, and Calaveras.

 

 

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Iowa had the 12th highest foreclosure rate. With 358 housing units out of 1,412,789 homes going into foreclosure, the 31st most populated state’s foreclosure rate was one in every 3,946 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Monroe, Lucas, Greene, Osceola, and Keokuk.

 

 

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Ranking 10th in population, Michigan took the 11th spot with a foreclosure rate of one in every 3,677 homes. With a total of 4,570,173 housing units, the state had 1,243 foreclosure filings. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Shiawassee, Bay, Calhoun, Muskegon, and Genesee.

 

Recommended: Your 2022 Guide to All Things Home

 

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With 432 of its 1,530,197 homes going into foreclosure, Connecticut had the 10th highest foreclosure rate at one in every 3,542 households. In the 29th most populated state, the counties that had the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Windham, New Haven, Fairfield, Litchfield, and Hartford.

 

 

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The 17th largest state by population, Indiana took the ninth spot with a foreclosure rate of one in every 3,348 homes. Of its 2,923,175 homes, 873 homes were foreclosed on in July. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Clinton, Pulaski, Vermillion, Howard, and Madison.

 

 

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The third most populated state in the country has a total of 9,865,350 housing units, of which 3,001 went into foreclosure. The state’s foreclosure rate is one in every 3,287 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Taylor, Escambia, Polk, Broward, and Okeechobee.

 

 

Elisa.rolle

 

The third most populated state in the country has a total of 9,865,350 housing units, of which 3,429 went into foreclosure. The state’s foreclosure rate is one in every 2,877 homes. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Gadsden, Gilchrist, Osceola, Santa Rosa, and Pasco.

 

 

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Ranked 18th for most populated state, Maryland took sixth place for highest foreclosure rate. With a total of 2,530,844 housing units, of which 826 housing units went into foreclosure, the state’s foreclosure rate was one in every 3,064 households. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Charles, Allegany, Queen Anne’s County, Baltimore City, and Caroline.

 

 

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With one in every 2,976 homes going into foreclosure, South Carolina took the fifth spot once again. Ranked 23rd for population, South Carolina has 2,344,963 housing units and saw 788 foreclosure filings. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Kershaw, Fairfield, Orangeburg, Richland, and Barnwell.

 

 

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Ranking 32nd in population, Nevada took the fourth spot for foreclosure rate for the second month in a row. With one in every 2,609 homes going into foreclosure, and a total of 1,281,018 housing units, the state had 491 foreclosure filings. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): White Pine, Humboldt, Lander, Clark, and Pershing.

 

 

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With a foreclosure rate of one in every 2,564 homes, New Jersey placed third for highest foreclosure rate. The 11th most populated state has 3,761,229 housing units, of which 1,467 went into foreclosure. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Salem, Sussex, Cumberland, Warren, and Gloucester.

 

 

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Illinois slipped from first to second place in July. Of its 5,426,429 homes, 2,325 went into foreclosure, making the sixth most populated state’s foreclosure rate one in every 2,334. The counties with the most foreclosures per housing unit were (from highest to lowest): Mason, Macoupin, Rock Island, Will, and Edgar.

 

 

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The sixth least populated state in the country, Delaware nabbed the top spot for highest foreclosure rate. With one in every 2,127 homes going into foreclosure and a total 448,735 housing units, Delaware saw a total of 211 foreclosure filings. With only three counties in the state, the most foreclosures per housing unit were in (from highest to lowest): Kent, New Castle, and Sussex.

 

 

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Of all 50 states, California had the most foreclosure filings (3,492); South Dakota had the least (7). As for the states with the highest foreclosure rates, Delaware, Illinois, and New Jersey took the top three spots, respectively.

 

Two regions – The Great Lakes and the Mideast – tied for having the largest presence among the 10 states that ranked the highest for foreclosure rates. The states in the Great Lakes region were (from highest to lowest): Illinois, Ohio, and Indiana. The states in the Mideast region were (from highest to lowest): Delaware, New Jersey, and Maryland.

 

The Plains region had the largest presence among the 10 states that ranked the lowest for foreclosure rates. The states were (from highest to lowest): Kansas, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

 

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This article originally appeared on SoFi.comand was syndicated by MediaFeed.org.

 

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