Ready to change careers? 5 ways to make it easier

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You’ve been doing the same thing for years, and you’re ready for something new. But what can you do with your life? How can you make a change that really helps improve your overall well-being? 

It’s not always easy to know where to start. We will discuss five easy ways to do something different with your career. We will also provide tips on how to make the transition as smooth as possible.

Try some volunteering

If you’re considering exploring something new, but don’t want to take a big risk, volunteering is a great way to get started. You can volunteer for nonprofit organizations or a business that are related to your interests, or try something completely different. This is a great way to explore career options without making a long-term commitment.

If you’re looking for ways to make a difference in your community, volunteering is a great way to do that.

Tips for getting started:

  • Do some research to find organizations that align with your interests
  • Reach out to the organization and express your interest in volunteering
  • Be prepared to commit a few hours each week or month, depending on the organization’s needs

Volunteering is a great way to explore career options and make a difference that you can fit around your existing setup.

Go back to school

If you’re looking for a more significant change, going back to school may be the right option for you. This can be a great way to explore career options and gain the skills and knowledge to make a successful transition.

Of course, going back to school is a big commitment. But if you’re sure that this is the right path for you, it can be a great way to make a major change in your career.

When we say “school” you don’t always have to look at universities or colleges. You could try online learning platforms such as Udemy, or do some research into evening classes at your local community center. It’s easy to find a course you might love to sink your teeth into in your spare time. As long as you continue to invest your time in learning, more opportunities will open up.

Get a job in a related field

If you’re looking to make a change but aren’t sure where to start, getting a job in a related field can be a great option. This can help you gain experience in the field you’re interested in without making too big of a commitment. 

Sometimes we just need a change for the sake of change. If we feel stale and stuck in a rut, what’s sometimes best for our mental health is to get out rather than wait for the perfect next step to materialise.

A sideways step that is a relevant or natural progression of your current job might not feel ideal, especially if you want to change industry or field entirely, but it can help you gain experience and build momentum.

Remember, you don’t have to do this forever. It can be a great way to get your foot in the door and gain some experience before making a more significant change.

Network

If you’re looking to make a change, networking can be a great way to do it. When you network, you meet people who may be able to help you make the transition. You can also learn about opportunities, get useful information about available jobs, and get your name out there. 

Networking doesn’t have to be difficult or intimidating. You can start by attending events or meetups that are related to your interests. You don’t need to travel miles or attend events every day. Use your judgement to decide which networking format suits you best. You can also reach out to people you know and ask if they have recommendations.

Remember, when you’re networking, you’re not just trying to sell yourself. You’re also trying to build relationships. So be genuine, be interested in others, and don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Building a strong network can help you make a successful transition to a new career, and you can do it for free!

Get a mentor

A mentor can help you navigate a job transition and offer advice and guidance. 

When choosing a mentor, look for someone who is established in the field you’re interested in. You can also reach out to your network and see if anyone has any recommendations.

Remember, your mentor is there to help you. Don’t be afraid to ask for advice or guidance. And be sure to return the favor by mentoring someone else when you’re established in your new career.

Making a change in your career can be daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. By taking small steps and being strategic, you can make a successful transition. You might just find your dream career in the process.

Making a smooth transition

Once you’ve found an opportunity or you take a job in a different industry, it can seem quite daunting. You need to learn how the new industry works and get up to speed quickly. This can be difficult, but there are a few things you can do to make the transition smoother.

Talk to people who have made a similar transition and ask for advice. Often you can find people who can been through a career change themselves, and you’d be surprised how eager people are to share useful advice if you ask them. 

Do your research and try to get a good understanding of how the new industry works. This will help you feel more confident when you start your new job. Spend time on industry trade press reading the latest news. Try YouTube for niche videos talking about key aspects of the industry you might not know much about. Whichever way you like to learn, just make sure to invest time in learning!

Finally, don’t be afraid to ask for help from your colleagues. They can offer guidance and support as you get used to your new role. Explain how you have a different background and therefore may need support in a few different areas. People are almost always happy to offer help. 

This article originally appeared on Tribe And Seek and was syndicated by MediaFeed.

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The 25 best careers for people who want to be their own boss

The 25 best careers for people who want to be their own boss

Plenty of people dream of becoming their own boss. However, options for self-employment are heavily dependent on one’s industry and occupation. To help better inform your career planning, this MagnifyMoney study takes a closer look at the occupations best suited for self-employment.

When evaluating the leading occupations where you can be your own boss, we looked at several key factors: median earnings, change in earnings, estimated employment change for long-term opportunity, annual occupational openings and the percent of people in each occupation who are self-employed.

istockphoto/nd3000

Plenty of people dream of becoming their own boss. However, options for self-employment are heavily dependent on one’s industry and occupation. To help better inform your career planning, this MagnifyMoney study takes a closer look at the occupations best suited for self-employment.

When evaluating the leading occupations where you can be your own boss, we looked at several key factors: median earnings, change in earnings, estimated employment change for long-term opportunity, annual occupational openings and the percent of people in each occupation who are self-employed.

istockphoto/nd3000

In order to find the best occupations for people looking to be self-employed, we looked at data on 579 occupations. We compared them across six metrics, all pulled from the BLS. Specifically we looked at the following:

  • Percent of workers who are self-employed. We considered this the most important metric to indicate the best careers for self-employment, assigning it a weighting double the other metrics when creating our ranking. For this metric, a higher number indicates the job is more suitable for self-employment as there are already plenty of self-employed individuals in the industry. It also means you’ll have some company in the self-employment journey.
  • Estimated employment change 2018 to 2028. This metric shows the total new jobs for each occupation in the decade from 2018 to 2028. If you’re going to take the plunge into self-employment, you’re going to want to make sure there’s room for growth in your chosen industry. Otherwise, you could get squeezed out too early and left finding yet another job. A higher number here indicates more potential employment in the long term, which would help a job rank higher on our list.
  • Estimated annual occupational openings 2018 to 2028. This number provides a closer look at employment change between 2018 and 2028 by giving the estimated number of job openings each year. The best careers to be your own boss will have higher numbers in this metric as well, as that indicates for long-term opportunity.
  • Percentage change in estimated employment change 2018 to 2028. In addition to the number of projected new jobs, we also looked at the percentage of this change. This metric shows how fast an occupation is growing or contracting. A higher percentage means faster growth which, again, indicates greater long-term opportunity.
  • 2018 median earnings. Of course as with any job, you’re going to want to check the earnings prospects here, especially since being self-employed means you often set your own rates. So we included median annual earnings for each occupation for 2018 for you to get a better idea of each job. This is weighted the same as all the other metrics (except percentage of self-employed workers), which is why you will see a range of earnings within the top 25.
  • Percent change in earnings 2017 to 2018. Looking at a specific year’s earnings provides just a snapshot of that occupation’s pay. So we also took into account the percent change in earnings for each occupation from 2017 to 2018 to show whether an occupation’s wages seem to be increasing or not. A higher percentage indicates faster wage growth and can indicate a more sustainable job over the years, especially when paired with a high percentage of employment growth.
  • Education needed. This metric was not used to create our ranking, but used rather as a bonus tidbit of information. Knowing what kind of education or training is needed for an occupation can help you determine whether it’s right for you or what steps you need to take to be eligible for self-employment in that career.

In order to create our final rankings, we first ranked each occupation in each metric. We then found each occupation’s average ranking across the metrics, giving a double weighting to self-employment rate. We used this average ranking to assign a score to each occupation. The occupations with the highest scores ranked first while the occupation with the lowest score ranked last.

istockphoto/Ridofranz

In order to find the best occupations for people looking to be self-employed, we looked at data on 579 occupations. We compared them across six metrics, all pulled from the BLS. Specifically we looked at the following:

  • Percent of workers who are self-employed. We considered this the most important metric to indicate the best careers for self-employment, assigning it a weighting double the other metrics when creating our ranking. For this metric, a higher number indicates the job is more suitable for self-employment as there are already plenty of self-employed individuals in the industry. It also means you’ll have some company in the self-employment journey.
  • Estimated employment change 2018 to 2028. This metric shows the total new jobs for each occupation in the decade from 2018 to 2028. If you’re going to take the plunge into self-employment, you’re going to want to make sure there’s room for growth in your chosen industry. Otherwise, you could get squeezed out too early and left finding yet another job. A higher number here indicates more potential employment in the long term, which would help a job rank higher on our list.
  • Estimated annual occupational openings 2018 to 2028. This number provides a closer look at employment change between 2018 and 2028 by giving the estimated number of job openings each year. The best careers to be your own boss will have higher numbers in this metric as well, as that indicates for long-term opportunity.
  • Percentage change in estimated employment change 2018 to 2028. In addition to the number of projected new jobs, we also looked at the percentage of this change. This metric shows how fast an occupation is growing or contracting. A higher percentage means faster growth which, again, indicates greater long-term opportunity.
  • 2018 median earnings. Of course as with any job, you’re going to want to check the earnings prospects here, especially since being self-employed means you often set your own rates. So we included median annual earnings for each occupation for 2018 for you to get a better idea of each job. This is weighted the same as all the other metrics (except percentage of self-employed workers), which is why you will see a range of earnings within the top 25.
  • Percent change in earnings 2017 to 2018. Looking at a specific year’s earnings provides just a snapshot of that occupation’s pay. So we also took into account the percent change in earnings for each occupation from 2017 to 2018 to show whether an occupation’s wages seem to be increasing or not. A higher percentage indicates faster wage growth and can indicate a more sustainable job over the years, especially when paired with a high percentage of employment growth.
  • Education needed. This metric was not used to create our ranking, but used rather as a bonus tidbit of information. Knowing what kind of education or training is needed for an occupation can help you determine whether it’s right for you or what steps you need to take to be eligible for self-employment in that career.

In order to create our final rankings, we first ranked each occupation in each metric. We then found each occupation’s average ranking across the metrics, giving a double weighting to self-employment rate. We used this average ranking to assign a score to each occupation. The occupations with the highest scores ranked first while the occupation with the lowest score ranked last.

istockphoto/Ridofranz

Self-employed: 28.4%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.1%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 20.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.7%

2018 wage: $24,330

Index: 83.32

istockphoto/Antonio_Diaz

Self-employed: 28.4%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.1%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 20.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.7%

2018 wage: $24,330

Index: 83.32

istockphoto/Antonio_Diaz

Self-employed: 2.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 16.0%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 64.9

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.3%

2018 wage: $127,990

Index: 83.35

There are a couple wage standouts towards the bottom of the top 25. For example, financial managers made $127,990 in 2018, but the profession ranks low due to its low percentage of self-employed workers (2%). This could prove difficult for those trying to break into the industry as self-employed.

istockphoto/undrey’

Self-employed: 2.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 16.0%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 64.9

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.3%

2018 wage: $127,990

Index: 83.35

There are a couple wage standouts towards the bottom of the top 25. For example, financial managers made $127,990 in 2018, but the profession ranks low due to its low percentage of self-employed workers (2%). This could prove difficult for those trying to break into the industry as self-employed.

istockphoto/undrey’

Self-employed: 21.5%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 11.4%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 34.4

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.5%

2018 wage: $38,400

Index: 83.77

istockphoto/Ivan-balvan

Self-employed: 21.5%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 11.4%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 34.4

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.5%

2018 wage: $38,400

Index: 83.77

istockphoto/Ivan-balvan

Self-employed: 4.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 17.6%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 42.2

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.4%

2018 wage: $99,730

Index: 83.98

istockphoto/DragonImages

Self-employed: 4.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 17.6%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 42.2

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.4%

2018 wage: $99,730

Index: 83.98

istockphoto/DragonImages

Self-employed: 10.7%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 47.6

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.7%

2018 wage: $33,780

Index: 85.05

istockphoto/SeventyFour

Self-employed: 10.7%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 47.6

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.7%

2018 wage: $33,780

Index: 85.05

istockphoto/SeventyFour

Self-employed: 7.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.4%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 79.4

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.8%

2018 wage: $65,230

Index: 85.23

istockphoto/iBrave

Self-employed: 7.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.4%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 79.4

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.8%

2018 wage: $65,230

Index: 85.23

istockphoto/iBrave

Self-employed: 15.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 13.0%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 15.1

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.1%

2018 wage: $69,430

Index: 86.03

istockphoto/DragonImages

Self-employed: 15.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 13.0%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 15.1

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.1%

2018 wage: $69,430

Index: 86.03

istockphoto/DragonImages

Self-employed: 20.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 6.1%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 45.7

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.4%

2018 wage: $120,910

Index: 86.13

Around 20% of lawyers are self-employed and they made $120,910 in 2018. Still, there’s less room for new prospective self-employed workers to join the legal industry, as it’s expected to grow only 6.1% in a decade.

istockphoto/scyther5

Self-employed: 20.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 6.1%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 45.7

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.4%

2018 wage: $120,910

Index: 86.13

Around 20% of lawyers are self-employed and they made $120,910 in 2018. Still, there’s less room for new prospective self-employed workers to join the legal industry, as it’s expected to grow only 6.1% in a decade.

istockphoto/scyther5

Self-employed: 26.6%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 16.0%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 54.5

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.5%

2018 wage: $23,760

Index: 86.65

istockphoto/Donyanedomam

Self-employed: 26.6%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 16.0%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 54.5

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.5%

2018 wage: $23,760

Index: 86.65

istockphoto/Donyanedomam

Self-employed: 46.7%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 8.7%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 24.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.5%

2018 wage: $48,220

Index: 86.97

istockphoto/Halfpoint

Self-employed: 46.7%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 8.7%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 24.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.5%

2018 wage: $48,220

Index: 86.97

istockphoto/Halfpoint

Self-employed: 8.7%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 22.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 41.5

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.1%

2018 wage: $44,630

Index: 88.53

The industry with the highest projected percentage growth from 2018 to 2028 is substance abuse, behavioral disorder and mental health counselors, expected to grow 22.5% in that time.

istockphoto/fizkes

Self-employed: 8.7%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 22.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 41.5

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.1%

2018 wage: $44,630

Index: 88.53

The industry with the highest projected percentage growth from 2018 to 2028 is substance abuse, behavioral disorder and mental health counselors, expected to grow 22.5% in that time.

istockphoto/fizkes

Self-employed: 9.4%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 13.6%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 66.1

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.5%

2018 wage: $53,910

Index: 88.95

DepositPhotos.com

Self-employed: 9.4%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 13.6%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 66.1

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.5%

2018 wage: $53,910

Index: 88.95

DepositPhotos.com

Self-employed: 13.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 18.4%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 5.1

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.8%

2018 wage: $93,830

Index: 89.33

istockphoto/Ridofranz

Self-employed: 13.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 18.4%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 5.1

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.8%

2018 wage: $93,830

Index: 89.33

istockphoto/Ridofranz

Self-employed: 22.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 8.8%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 173.6

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.8%

2018 wage: $29,000

Index: 89.61

istockphoto/juefraphoto

Self-employed: 22.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 8.8%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 173.6

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.8%

2018 wage: $29,000

Index: 89.61

istockphoto/juefraphoto

Self-employed: 22.1%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 19.2%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 9.8

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 5.8%

2018 wage: $49,930

Index: 90.58

istockphoto/fizkes

Self-employed: 22.1%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 19.2%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 9.8

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 5.8%

2018 wage: $49,930

Index: 90.58

istockphoto/fizkes

Self-employed: 27.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 8.0%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 116.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.1%

2018 wage: $46,590

Index: 92.94

istockphoto/Deagreez

Self-employed: 27.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 8.0%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 116.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.1%

2018 wage: $46,590

Index: 92.94

istockphoto/Deagreez

Self-employed: 17.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 13.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 99.9

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.4%

2018 wage: $83,610

Index: 93.67

istockphoto/fizkes

Self-employed: 17.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 13.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 99.9

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.4%

2018 wage: $83,610

Index: 93.67

istockphoto/fizkes

Self-employed: 27.6%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 179.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.7%

2018 wage: $35,800

Index: 93.88

istock/dima_sidelnikov

Self-employed: 27.6%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 179.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.7%

2018 wage: $35,800

Index: 93.88

istock/dima_sidelnikov

Self-employed: 42.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 19.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 51.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.4%

2018 wage: $25,980

Index: 94.02

istockphoto/mangostock

Self-employed: 42.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 19.5%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 51.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.4%

2018 wage: $25,980

Index: 94.02

istockphoto/mangostock

Self-employed: 30.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 14.7%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 14.6

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.5%

2018 wage: $76,990

Index: 94.47

istockphoto/KatarzynaBialasiewicz

Self-employed: 30.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 14.7%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 14.6

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.5%

2018 wage: $76,990

Index: 94.47

istockphoto/KatarzynaBialasiewicz

Self-employed: 33.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 22.2%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 24.2

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.6%

2018 wage: $41,420

Index: 94.51

istockphoto/LSOphoto

Self-employed: 33.0%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 22.2%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 24.2

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 3.6%

2018 wage: $41,420

Index: 94.51

istockphoto/LSOphoto

Self-employed: 54.5%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 6.3%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 91.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.8%

2018 wage: $107,480

Index: 95.27

After real estate sales agents, the top third pick, managers have the highest percentage of self-employed workers at 54.5%. Managers made a whopping median $107,480 in 2017 and typically requires a bachelor’s degree.

istockphoto/nd3000

Self-employed: 54.5%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 6.3%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 91.3

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 1.8%

2018 wage: $107,480

Index: 95.27

After real estate sales agents, the top third pick, managers have the highest percentage of self-employed workers at 54.5%. Managers made a whopping median $107,480 in 2017 and typically requires a bachelor’s degree.

istockphoto/nd3000

Self-employed: 56.4%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 6.9%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 38.9

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 5.9%

2018 wage: $48,690

Index: 95.62

Real estate agent is the third best job for being self-employed. Roughly 56% of real estate agents are self employed, the highest percentage out of the top 25.

In 2018, the average real estate agent made $48,690, and average earnings for this profession are on the rise. From 2017 to 2018, the average real estate agent saw earnings rise by nearly 6%, perhaps related to the ever-increasing value of homes in America’s largest cities.

istockphoto/fizkes

Self-employed: 56.4%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 6.9%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 38.9

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 5.9%

2018 wage: $48,690

Index: 95.62

Real estate agent is the third best job for being self-employed. Roughly 56% of real estate agents are self employed, the highest percentage out of the top 25.

In 2018, the average real estate agent made $48,690, and average earnings for this profession are on the rise. From 2017 to 2018, the average real estate agent saw earnings rise by nearly 6%, perhaps related to the ever-increasing value of homes in America’s largest cities.

istockphoto/fizkes

Self-employed: 39.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 9.8%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 40.2

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.2%

2018 wage: $93,370

Index: 97.64

The second-best job for being your own boss is construction manager. Roughly 40% of people employed in this profession are self-employed.

The median wage for construction managers in 2018 was $93,370, a 2.20% increase from 2017. If you’d like to be your own boss as a construction worker, chances are you’ll need a bachelor’s degree, reports the BLS.

istockphoto/Cineberg

Self-employed: 39.8%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 9.8%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 40.2

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 2.2%

2018 wage: $93,370

Index: 97.64

The second-best job for being your own boss is construction manager. Roughly 40% of people employed in this profession are self-employed.

The median wage for construction managers in 2018 was $93,370, a 2.20% increase from 2017. If you’d like to be your own boss as a construction worker, chances are you’ll need a bachelor’s degree, reports the BLS.

istockphoto/Cineberg

Self-employed: 37.6%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.8%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 46.9

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.2%

2018 wage: $54,240

Index: 100.00

The best occupation for self-employment is food service manager. Currently, more than a third of food service managers are self-employed. Plus, the industry is expected to grow 10.8% from 2018 to 2028.

The average food-service manager made $54,240 in 2018, a decent income for a job that typically does not require a college degree, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Most of the best jobs to take if you want to be self-employed do not require a college degree. In addition to food service managers and real estate sales agents detailed above, massage therapists, chauffeurs, construction laborers and carpenters all cracked the top 10.

If you do want to be self-employed, it will still probably require some planning. Even if they don’t require a college degree, a good number of the highest ranking jobs require previous work experience or on the job training.

This article originally appeared on MagnifyMoney.com and was syndicated by MediaFeed.org.

istockphoto/SeventyFour

Self-employed: 37.6%

Projected employment % change 2018-2019: 10.8%

Annual occupational openings 2018-2019*: 46.9

% growth median earnings (2017-2018): 4.2%

2018 wage: $54,240

Index: 100.00

The best occupation for self-employment is food service manager. Currently, more than a third of food service managers are self-employed. Plus, the industry is expected to grow 10.8% from 2018 to 2028.

The average food-service manager made $54,240 in 2018, a decent income for a job that typically does not require a college degree, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Most of the best jobs to take if you want to be self-employed do not require a college degree. In addition to food service managers and real estate sales agents detailed above, massage therapists, chauffeurs, construction laborers and carpenters all cracked the top 10.

If you do want to be self-employed, it will still probably require some planning. Even if they don’t require a college degree, a good number of the highest ranking jobs require previous work experience or on the job training.

This article originally appeared on MagnifyMoney.com and was syndicated by MediaFeed.org.

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