Bored with plain ol’ coffee? These recipes will put some zip in your sip

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These days, it’s so easy to pull through a coffee shop drive-thru and order your morning (or afternoon) coffee to keep you running smoothly. These days, the fancy coffee drinks, lattes and blended beverages are packed with sugary, flavored syrup and often not clean at all.

If your clean-eating lifestyle makes it hard to satisfy your delicious coffee craving, these clean-eating coffee recipes are just what you need. This collection of coffee drinks includes cold brew, slow cooker lattes, blended drinks and copy-cat (but clean!) recipes for some of your coffee shop holiday favorites.

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You don’t have to give up your coffee fix in order to eat and drink real, clean food. These clean-eating coffee drinks take out all the surgery, unhealthy aspects of your favorite drinks. Don’t cut out the caffeine; enjoy it more with these coffee recipes.

Pumpkin Spice Latte

1. Pumpkin Spice Latte 

This pumpkin spice latte brings a new meaning to the word “delicious!”

Dalgona Coffee

2. Dalgona Coffee

This low-carb Dalgona coffee recipe is a sweet, fluffy cloud of morning goodness in a cup. And you thought coffee was boring!

Fancy latte

3. Latte With Coconut Milk

This latte with coconut milk is the perfect, dairy-free start to your morning!

Orange Maple Frappuccino

4. Orange Maple Frappuccino

This orange maple frappuccino recipe could be your next favorite coffee drink!

coffee beans cups

5. Blender Coffee

This blender coffee is a fabulously satisfying way to start your day!

Oma’s Holiday Spiced Coffee

6. Oma’s Holiday Spiced Coffee

Growing up as a child, my grandmother Oma’s kitchen was always a safe haven. It was a place of comfort, laughter and this awesome holiday spiced coffee.

Cold Brew Coffee

7. Cold Brew Coffee

This cold brew coffee is the perfect start to any morning!

Apple Pie Spice Latte

8. Apple Spiced Latte

This apple pie spice latte is fabulous on an early autumn morning!

Pumpkin spice chai latte

9. Pumpkin Spice Chai Latte

This pumpkin spice chai latte is an easy, homemade version of this coffee shop classic.

Clean Eating Mocha Coconut Frappuccino

10. Clean-Eating Mocha Coconut Frappuccino

This delicious, clean-eating mocha coconut frappuccino recipe will put frappuccinos in a whole new light!

peppermint hot chocolate

11. Peppermint Mocha

This peppermint mocha recipe is the perfect way to ring in your holiday spirit!

Coffee milk

12. Soy Coffee Creamer

If you prefer soy milk, then this clean-eating, soy coffee creamer could be the perfect way to make your morning cup of coffee much, much creamier.

Related:

This article
originally appeared on 
TheGraciousPantry.com and was
syndicated by
MediaFeed.org.

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Here’s where people drink the most coffee

Here’s where people drink the most coffee

One great way to explore a new culture is to enjoy the locals’ favorite caffeinated drink (it helps beat jet lag ,too). Truly the world’s favorite bean, coffee, originated in Ethiopia and spread across the globe to become one of the planet’s top agricultural commodities.

Whether filtered or pressed, prepared with steamed milk, cardamom, liquor or sugar, and whether it’s pronounced cafe, koffee or qahwah, coffee is loved in every part of the globe. It may be almost ubiquitous, but the cultures surrounding it are diverse. Understanding the world’s coffee habits and costs provides insight into local history, spiritual practices and values.

But who is drinking all that coffee? We used Statista to find out who’s the most caffeinated.

sonatali

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 2.7

Anton_Petrus / iStock

  • Continent: North America
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 2.8

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 2.9

PumpizoldA / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 3

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 3.1

Cristian Mircea Balate / istockphoto

  • Continent: Middle East & Asia
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 3.1

Anson Fernandez Dionisio / iStock

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 3.5

Maglara/istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 3.5

manjik

  • Continent: North America
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 3.7

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 3.7

sfabisuk / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 3.9

DedMityay / istockphoto

  • Continent: Middle East & Asia
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 3.9

Dreamer Company / iStock

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 4.1

Remedios / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 4.2

proslgn / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 4.3

RossHelen / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 4.3

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 4.4

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 4.5

SeanPavonePhoto / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 4.8

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 4.8

Donyanedomam / iStock

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 4.9

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 5.1

RudyBalasko / istockphoto

  • Continent: Middle East & Asia
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 5.2

SHansche / iStock

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 5.4

martinhosmart / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 5.4

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: South America
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 5.4

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Middle East & Asia
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 5.7

Paul Saad / iStock

  • Continent: North America
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 5.8

diegograndi/istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 6.6

bluejayphoto / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 6.8

bruev / iStock

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 7.4

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 7.7

DepositPhotos.com

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 8.2

Yasonya / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 8.2

LuCaAr / istockphoto

  • Continent: Europe
  • Coffee Consumption per capita (kg): 11.1

It’s no surprise that Luxembourg, smack dab in the cultural crossroads of coffee-loving Europe, drinks the most coffee in the world. It has a wide variety of coffee experiences inspired by the city’s many ex-pat cultures. 

Try a Scandinavian style “hygge” coffee shop for coziness, French-inspired bakeries and coffee shops, or lively Italian-inspired espresso bars.

Xantana / istockphoto

Some of the world’s biggest coffee-producing regions, including Central and South America and Vietnam, are also some of the cheapest places to enjoy a coffee. 

Brazil produces the world’s most coffee beans and is also a large consumer. Ordering a cafe puro (black coffee often filtered through a sock) or cafe latte (filtered coffee with copious amounts of milk) averages only $1.89 a cup.

jacoblund

We found the coffee consumption per capita data from Statista, where they combine economic developments and trend scouting with statistical and mathematical forecasting techniques. For more information, see here.

Related:

This article
originally appeared on 
Cashnetusa.comand was
syndicated by
MediaFeed.org.

ronnieliew / Wikimedia Commons

Featured Image Credit: TheGraciousPantry.com.

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