How long does it take to get EIDL funds after approval?

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If you haven’t heard of the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL), it helps small businesses negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. If you think your small business might be eligible, you might want to look into applying for one. These loans have some of the lowest SBA loan rates available and a 30-year repayment period.

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But before you apply, you might want to know how long it will take to receive EIDL funds after approval. After all, you may not have weeks or months to wait, given that your business may still be struggling and you might need working capital fast. 

In this article, we’ll discuss the process of getting an EIDL loan, as well as what the expected SBA loan deposit time is once you’ve been approved.

Related: What are liquid assets?

What Is the EIDL Loan?

Before we dive into how long it takes to receive EIDL funds, let’s review what the EIDL program is. Created by the Small Business Administration (SBA), this program is generally meant to assist businesses (and homeowners) in recovering from declared disasters like hurricanes or floods. But due to 2020’s coronavirus pandemic, the program added a special loan specifically for businesses hit the hardest by the pandemic and its shutdowns.

The EIDL loan for COVID-19 has two components: The loan itself (which is not a taxable loan) and two Advances that some businesses qualify for. The loan must be repaid, but the Advances do not have to be paid back.

The loans have SBA’s usual low fixed interest rates for a period of 30 years:

  • 3.75% for businesses
  • 2.75% for nonprofits

There is no prepayment penalty if you decide to pay off the loan early.

Who Should Apply?

If your business, like thousands of other small businesses in the U.S., has been affected by the coronavirus pandemic, you have probably struggled financially. The EIDL program is designed to provide financing to help businesses like yours continue normal operations (or as close to normal as possible) so they can get back on their feet.

If you’ve had difficulty paying bills as your business has started to resume normal operations, you might benefit from an EIDL loan. If you’re ready to hire employees again and need a little cash in the bank to cover payroll, EIDL loans can help with that, too.

How Much Can I Get in EIDL Funds?

The EIDL program allows qualifying business owners to borrow up to $2 million. The SBA will calculate EIDL loan amounts for a business based on its annual revenues, how much it has lost because of the pandemic and how many employees it has. Note that collateral is required for EIDL loans greater than $25,000. 

There are also two Advance programs: the Targeted Advance and the Supplemental Targeted Advance. If you qualify, you can receive up to $15,000 that does not have to be repaid.

What Can I Use an EIDL Loan For?

Some SBA loans have particular requirements about what you can and cannot use loan proceeds for. The funds you get from the EIDL program, whether for the loan or the Advance, must be used for normal business expenses. These include the following:

  • Payroll
  • Healthcare benefits for employees
  • Rent 
  • Utilities
  • Fixed debt payments
  • Repairs
  • Replacing inventory
  • Prepaying commercial debt
  • Paying federal business debt

The SBA has an online application for the EIDL program. You will be asked for the following:

  • Questions about your business, including its name, address and Employer Identification Number (or Social Security Number if it’s a sole proprietorship)
  •  Annual revenues for the 12 months before the disaster
  • The cost of goods 
  • The number of employees you have

Generally, you’ll need to be able to demonstrate the loss your business experienced because of the pandemic. Bear in mind, too, that from Sept. 8, 2021, to Oct. 8, 2021, the SBA will look only at loans of $500,000 or less. After that 30-day window, it will consider applications for larger loans.

 

Once you submit your application, the SBA will review it to see if you qualify, both for the EIDL loan and the Advances. It’s important to fill your application out correctly to avoid delays in its processing.

How Long Does It Take to Receive EIDL Funds After Approval?

As for the time it takes from when you’re approved to when you actually get your SBA loan funds, it partly depends on you. If you’re approved for an EIDL loan, you’ll be sent an email with details on how much you’re eligible to borrow. Once you sign the agreement, loan proceeds will be deposited into your business bank account within five to 10 business days.

When you apply, make sure you’ve correctly entered your business bank account number and routing number so there’s no delay in your funds reaching your account.

Here are the steps to getting your EIDL loan:

  • Step 1: Gather your information, including revenues and business details.
  • Step 2: Apply for the EIDL loan online. It may take over two hours, so plan enough time.
  • Step 3: Wait for the SBA to review your application. (Remember that if you are applying for more than $500,000, your application will not be considered between Sept. 8, 2021, and Oct. 8, 2021.)
  • Step 4: Review your offer and sign the loan agreement.
  • Step 5: Wait for the funds to be deposited (5-10 business days). 

Do I Have to Repay an EIDL Loan?

As mentioned earlier, there are two parts to an EIDL loan. The first is the loan itself, which can be up to $2 million. You do have to pay back this loan. As of Sept. 8, 2021, you can defer payments on the loan for up to two years.

The potential second part is an Advance.

There are two different Advance programs, the Targeted Advance and the Supplemental Targeted Advance. Both are meant to help small businesses in low-income communities. The Supplemental Targeted Advance is aimed at even smaller businesses (with no more than 10 employees) who have suffered an even greater reduction in revenue than the Targeted Advance.

The maximum amount you can receive in total from the two Advance programs (if you are eligible) is $15,000. To qualify for one or both of the two Advance programs, your business must do the following:

For a Targeted Advance:

  • Be in a low-income community
  • Demonstrate more than a 30% reduction in revenue over an eight-week period starting on March 2, 2020, or later
  • Have 300 or fewer employees

For a Supplemental Targeted Advance:

  • Be in a low-income community
  • Demonstrate more than a 50% reduction in revenue over an eight-week period starting on March 2, 2020, or later
  • Have 10 or fewer employees

If you are approved for one or both of these Advance programs by the SBA, you do not have to pay back the funds, and the money is not taxable.

The Takeaway

Now that you know all about applying for EIDL loans, including how long it takes to actually receive the funds after approval, should you consider applying for one? If you qualify, it could well be a good avenue to explore as your business recovers from the effects of the pandemic. 

Learn more:

This article originally appeared on LanternCredit.com and was syndicated by MediaFeed.org.


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50 Investment Phrases, Decoded

50 investment phrases, decoded

Any new endeavor — from rock climbing to investing — means getting familiar with new words and phrases. Some investment terms may seem complex, but this list will take the mystery out of the most common investing terminology, so you can feel even more confident as you start your investing journey. 

RelatedIs there such a thing as a safe investment?

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Alpha is used to gauge the success of an investment strategy, portfolio, portfolio manager, or trader compared with a relevant benchmark. You may also hear alpha defined as “excess return” in that it refers to returns that can be attributed to active management, over and above market returns.

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An asset is anything that holds value that can be converted to cash. Personal assets might include your home, a car or other valuables. Business assets might include machinery or patents. When it comes to investing, assets are typically the securities you invest in.

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An asset class is a group of investments with similar characteristics that is likely to perform differently in the market than another asset class. Types of asset classes include stocks, bonds, real estate, currencies and more. Given the same market conditions, stocks and bonds often move in opposite directions. Most financial advisers recommend you invest in multiple asset classes in order to have a well-diversified portfolio and minimize risk.

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An asset allocation fund is a diversified portfolio consisting of various asset classes. Most asset allocation funds have a mix of stocks, bonds and cash equivalents. These types of funds can be popular as some advisors stress the importance of having diverse portfolios to minimize potential losses.

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Beta refers to how risky or volatile a security or portfolio is compared with the market overall. Calculating the beta of the stocks in your portfolio can help you determine how your portfolio might respond to market volatility. You can also gauge the beta of a stock to help determine how much risk it might add to your portfolio.

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A bear market occurs when the market declines, typically when broad market indexes fall 20% or more in two months or less. Bear markets can accompany a recession, but not always. They often signal that investors feel pessimistic about their investments’ ability to make money and the market’s ability to rebound.

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A bull market is the opposite of a bear market, meaning prices are rising or are expected to rise for extended periods of time. Bull markets usually mean security prices are rising for months or even years at a time.

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Blue chip companies are generally thought to be well-established, financially sound, and therefore high-quality investments. Blue chip stocks are typically large companies, and many of them are household names. In some cases, blue chips may be more expensive to invest in since they can be considered relatively stable and likely to grow.

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When governments or corporations need to borrow money they issue bonds. Investors who buy the bonds are effectively loaning that entity cash, which will be repaid according to the terms of the bond (e.g. a 10-year bond with an interest rate of 3%). Bonds are often considered to be relatively stable, lower-risk investments compared with stocks.

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An investment broker, whether a person or a firm, acts as a middleman to help investors buy and sell securities. Brokers may be necessary because some securities exchanges only allow members of that exchange to make an investment order. A broker’s primary function is to help clients place trades, although many brokers also help clients with market research and investment planning.

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You’ve probably heard that you should aim to have a diversified portfolio. That means investing in a range of asset classes that are likely to behave differently under different market conditions, in order to mitigate risk. A portfolio of only stocks, for instance, could be more vulnerable to market volatility than a portfolio that also included bonds, real estate, commodities and so on.

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When a company shares their profits with investors, these are called dividends. Dividends are often paid in cash (although they can be paid in stocks). Some companies — e.g. many blue chip firms — pay dividends, but not all companies do. Ordinary dividends are taxed differently than qualified dividends, so you may want to consult a tax professional if you own dividend-paying stocks.

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Also called fractional share investing, dollar based investing is a way for investors to buy partial shares of stocks. Instead of buying shares of a company, you instead invest a dollar amount. Dollar based investing is a great way for smaller investors to buy into popular companies that they may otherwise be priced out of.

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EBITDA is a way to evaluate a company’s performance that is considered more precise than simply looking at net income. EBITDA stands for: earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. To calculate EBITDA, use the following formula: Net Income + Interest + Taxes + Depreciation + Amortization.

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EBIT is a simpler way to calculate a company’s profits than EBITDA, as it’s only one part of the EBITDA equation (literally!). It stands for “earnings before interest and taxes.” It’s calculated using this formula: Net Income + Interest + Taxes.

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EPS stands for earnings per share, which is a common way investors measure how well a stock is performing. EPS is calculated by finding a company’s quarterly or annual net income and dividing it by the company’s outstanding shares of stock. Increases in EPS can be a sign that the company’s profit performance is on the upswing, whereas a decrease can be a red flag for investors.

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Exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, are similar to mutual funds in that the fund’s portfolio can include dozens or even hundreds of different securities, and investors buy shares of the fund. Unlike mutual funds, ETF shares can be traded like stocks throughout the day (mutual fund shares are traded once a day). Most ETFs are considered lower-cost, passive investments because they track an index, although there are actively managed ETFs.

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An expense ratio is an annual fee investors pay to cover the operating costs of mutual funds, index funds, ETFs and other types of funds. Fees are typically deducted from your investments automatically (you don’t pay a separate charge), and they can reduce your returns over time so it’s wise to shop around for lower fees. Expense ratios are calculated using this formula: Total Funds Costs / Total Fund Assets Under Management.

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Free cash flow is the money a company has after it has paid its expenses. This number is important to investors because it can show them how likely it is that a company could have extra cash for dividends or share buybacks. A continuous decrease in free cash flow over a few years can also be a red flag to investors.

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Growth stocks are shares in a company that’s growing faster than its competitors, typically showing potential for higher revenue or sales. Growth stock companies may be considered leaders in their industry.

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Hedge funds are usually managed by an LLC or limited partnership that invests in securities and other assets using money from multiple investors. Hedge funds tend to be more risky and expensive than mutual funds or ETFs, which often makes them accessible to more wealthy investors.

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Index funds are a type of mutual fund that invest in securities that mirror a particular index, such as the S&P 500 Index or the MSCI World Index. Indexes track many different sectors, from smaller U.S. companies to big global companies to various kinds of bonds. Each index acts as a proxy for how that market sector is performing; the corresponding index funds reflect that performance.

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The interest rate is the amount a lender charges to borrow money — and it can also mean the amount your cash earns in a savings, money market or CD account. The baseline interest rate in the U.S. is set by the Federal Reserve. This rate in turn influences savings rates, mortgage rates, credit card rates and more. Generally, when the Federal Reserve lowers interest rates, the stock market tends to rise.

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A large-cap company has $10 billion or more in market capitalization. These companies are often considered industry leaders, and are relatively conservative, low-risk, and safe investments. A company’s stock may be considered large cap, mid cap or small cap.

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Market capitalization, or market cap, is the value of a company’s total outstanding shares. It’s often used to measure a company’s value and build a diversified portfolio. You can calculate market cap by multiplying the number of outstanding shares by the current price per share. Companies with lower market caps usually have more room to grow and usually are associated with newer companies, meaning they can also be riskier.

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Mid-cap companies are usually between $2 billion to $10 billion in market capitalization, putting them somewhere between small- and large-cap companies. Many mid-cap companies are in a growth phase, making them attractive to some investors who believe the company may grow into a large-cap over time, although this is not guaranteed to happen.

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Mega-cap companies are the largest companies you can invest in, with a market value of $1 trillion or more. Mega-cap stocks are typically industry leaders and household name brands, like Apple or Microsoft.

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Mutual funds may invest in stocks, bonds and other securities — or a combination of these (e.g. a blended fund). Mutual funds can also be industry-specific (such as a mutual fund consisting only of energy stocks, green bonds, or tech companies and so on).

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When talking about investing, net income usually refers to how much a company makes (or its total losses) after it has paid all its expenses. Net income is therefore usually calculated by subtracting a company’s expenses from its revenue. Investors may want to know a company’s net income because it can help determine how profitable the company is, although EBITDA (defined above) is another measure.

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Not all stocks are publicly traded. These “private” stocks, often called over-the-counter stocks, usually have to be traded through a broker. Companies may offer OTC stocks if they don’t meet the requirements to be traded publicly. Such companies are often startups or other small companies. So, while these companies may eventually grow to be able to trade publicly, investing in them also carries the risk that they may fold or even engage in fraudulent activity since the market is far less regulated than publicly traded markets are.

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Investors commonly use P/E or price-to-earnings ratios to gain insight into how profitable a company is compared to its stock price. In other words, price-to-earnings ratios can help investors decide if the price of a stock is worth it when compared to how much a company is making.

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Banks are likely to offer their best customers — those with the best credit histories and the lowest risk of defaulting — a prime interest rate for a loan. The prime interest rate is generally the lowest rate the bank will offer. A bank’s criteria for determining their prime interest rate may vary, but most banks consider the federal funds rate when setting any interest rate.

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Portfolio management simply refers to how you select and manage the investments in your portfolio. There are many different management styles, such as active or passive, growth or value. Additionally, you can elect to manage your own portfolio or hire an individual or group to manage it for you.

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A preferred stock means investors own shares in a company and get scheduled dividends, similar to how bond interest payments work. Preferred socks may not fluctuate in price like common stocks do, meaning they are often less volatile and risky.

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You probably know what profit and losses are, but do you know how to read a company’s P&L or profit & loss statement? It can help you determine a company’s bottom line, as it can show you how well a company is doing compared to its peers in the same industry. If you’ve never read one before, this article about profit & loss statements could give you some tips on what to look for.

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Companies that offer stocks, bonds and mutual funds to investors are required to file a prospectus with the Securities and Exchange Commission that provides details about the investment they are offering (e.g. the expense ratio, the constituents of a fund and more). Investors can use the prospectus to better understand a given security and how it might fit in their portfolio, or not.

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A recession is a period of economic contraction. The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)  defines a recession further as a decline in monthly employment, personal income, and industrial production. As an investor, a recession may indicate a drop in the value of your portfolio, although this may be temporary: When looking at the history of U.S. recessions, the stock market has typically rebounded after recessions.

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Real estate investment trusts (REITs) are a way that investors can further diversify their portfolios. Instead of having the responsibility of managing an investment property yourself, you can invest in REITs, which are generally large-scale real estate projects that investors can help fund in exchange for partial ownership. Most REITs are publicly traded and pay dividends to investors.

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When looking for a company’s net income statement, you may come across the term “retained earnings,” also sometimes called unappropriated profit, uncovered loss, member capital, earnings surplus, or accumulated earnings. In general, retained earnings is the amount of money a company keeps and potentially reinvests after it gives its investors a dividend payout. 

As an investor, knowing whether a company had positive retained earnings can help you determine how much money it has to continue growing. If its retained earnings are negative, that could be a sign the company is in debt and may not be a good investment.

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Return on equity, sometimes called return on net worth, can help investors compare how well companies are managing their stockholders’ contributions. You can calculate it using this formula: Net income/Average shareholder equity. A higher return on equity can signal to investors that a company is managing its money efficiently.

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Return on investment (ROI) is just that: the return you get after making an investment in a stock, bond, mutual fund, and so forth. Investors generally hope for a positive ROI, meaning that their investment has made a profit. While a good ROI will vary depending on the type of investments you’re making, some investors look to the historic return of the stock market (about 7%) as a barometer.

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A small-cap company usually has a market cap of $250 million to $2 billion. Investors may be attracted to a small-cap company because they believe it has growth potential or may be undervalued.

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SPAC stands for special purpose acquisition company. SPACs are shell companies that list shares on an exchange to raise money so they can merge with a privately held company. Once the merger between the public SPAC and the private company is complete, that company is now in effect a public company — which is why a SPAC is sometimes called a backdoor IPO. Many companies may elect to use SPACs instead of traditional IPOs because they are often faster and less expensive.

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If you’ve made it this far, you probably know what a stock is. To review, a stock is a way to buy a piece of ownership into a company. You can buy and sell your stocks depending on whether you anticipate your stocks will decrease or increase in value.

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stock exchange is the place where you buy, sell, or trade stocks. Common U.S. stock exchanges are the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the Nasdaq.

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A stop-loss order can help investors have more control over their stocks. When a stock reaches a certain price that you choose, your broker will sell, buy, or trade that stock. Having a stop-loss order can help you limit how much money you make or lose in the stock market.

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A target date fund is a type of mutual fund that includes a mix of asset classes to provide investors with a portfolio that adjusts over time to become more conservative as they age. Target date funds are often used to help investors plan their retirements. Target funds are typically constructed around various target retirement years (e.g. 2030, 2040, 2050) so investors can pick a date that corresponds with their hoped-for retirement.

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value stock is a stock that investors believe is undervalued and/or inexpensive compared to its past prices on the stock market or with its competitors. Investors may consider a stock’s price-to-earnings ratio to help them determine if something is a value stock.

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Venture capital is money a startup uses to grow its business. This money usually comes from private investors or venture capital firms. Investors may elect to invest venture capital into startups they believe have the potential to be profitable with time.

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Yield is another way of referring to the return of an investment over a set period of time, expressed as a percentage. You may hear the term in relation to bonds (e.g. high-yield bonds), but yield is more accurately a measure of the cash flow an investor gets on the amount they invested in a security during that time period, and is different from total return.

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Getting familiar with a few key investing words and phrases can go a long way in helping you gain confidence when you’re new to investing. Getting fluent with investing terminology is like any other pursuit — there’s a learning curve at first, but the terms will feel more natural as you move forward and start investing regularly. 

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This article originally appeared on SoFi.comand was syndicated by MediaFeed.org.

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Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs): Investors should carefully consider the information contained in the prospectus, which contains the Fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other relevant information. You may obtain a prospectus from the Fund company’s website or by email customer service at investsupport@sofi.com. Please read the prospectus carefully prior to investing. Shares of ETFs must be bought and sold at market price, which can vary significantly from the Fund’s net asset value (NAV). Investment returns are subject to market volatility and shares may be worth more or less their original value when redeemed. The diversification of an ETF will not protect against loss. An ETF may not achieve its stated investment objective. Rebalancing and other activities within the fund may be subject to tax consequences.

Investment Risk: Diversification can help reduce some investment risk. It cannot guarantee profit, or fully protect in a down market.


Advisory services are offered through SoFi Wealth, LLC an SEC-registered Investment adviser. Information about SoFi Wealth’s advisory operations, services, and fees is set forth in SoFi Wealth’s current Form ADV Part 2 (Brochure), a copy of which is available upon request and at adviserinfo.sec.gov.

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