Here’s how many divorcees say Carole Baskin did it

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2020 was dominated by the pandemic, political events, and social movements. But in-between, there were plenty of other memorable moments worth revisiting, from pop culture to protecting your loved ones. Here’s a look at some of the highlights

Netflix struck while the iron was scalding hot.

One week after initial lockdown measures brought the country to a screeching halt last March, Netflix pounced on perhaps the most captive audience in modern times, unleashing the murder, mayhem, and madness of Tiger King.

Still without an answer to the show’s most pressing question, we decided to circle back and ask “all you cool cats and kittens” to weigh in: Do you believe Carole Baskin killed her husband?

Nearly half of our survey respondents watched Tiger King, and 72.9% of them believe Carole Baskin did it — she killed her first husband, Don Lewis. As if that wasn’t damning enough for the eccentric big-cat rights activist and CEO of Big Cat Rescue, this percentage increases considerably among several segments:

  • Divorcees (87%)
  • Right-wing (84.7%)
  • Non-voters (85.2%)

Ordering takeout suddenly became smart — dare we say, thoughtful?

The pandemic took a toll on many industries, but restaurants were hit especially hard. With various restrictions on indoor dining in effect across the country, many restaurants were suddenly left to rely on takeout and delivery orders to keep their businesses afloat. Suddenly, what had once been considered a bad habit or guilty pleasure became a safe, responsible way to support local small businesses.

54.2% of survey respondents capitalized on this perfect excuse to indulge by ordering more takeout/delivery in 2020 than before. 25.6% of respondents said they ordered the same amount as before and 13.6% actually ordered less than before.

  • The 25-34 age group was most likely to order more takeout/delivery (60.5%), whereas the 55+ age group was least likely (42%).
  • This behavior change was also noticeably higher among high-income households (68.2%), compared to just 44.1% of low-income households.
  • Of the survey respondents who reported testing positive for COVID-19, 62% said they ordered more takeout/delivery in 2020 than before.

Unlike many other areas of this study, which have varied significantly by gender and political views, this section revealed changes at consistent rates between men and women, and the right and left. Because everyone’s gotta eat.

As chaos and uncertainty became the norm, insurance needs became harder to avoid.

Over and over and over again, the events of 2020 underscored the importance of protecting yourself and your loved ones from the unexpected. Whether you like it or not, that means thinking about insurance. (Ok, no one likes that.)

95.1% of survey respondents said they have at least one type of insurance. Of all insured respondents, 38.6% updated an existing insurance policy in 2020. This percentage was highest among the following segments:

  • 44.5% among insured male respondents.
  • 47.9% among insured respondents who tested positive for COVID-19.
  • 44.7% among insured respondents who lost their job in 2020.
  • 46.5% among insured respondents who worked from home in 2020.
  • 50.3% among insured respondents who delayed a major life event in 2020.

Meanwhile, 27% of insured respondents said they bought a new insurance policy in 2020. This percentage was higher among the following demographics:

  • 34.9% among insured male respondents.
  • 44.8% among insured respondents who tested positive for COVID-19.
  • 32.5% among insured respondents who lost their job in 2020.
  • 33.3% among insured respondents who worked from home in 2020.
  • 36.5% among insured respondents who delayed a major life event in 2020.

In total, over half of insured respondents either updated an existing policy, bought a new policy, or did both in 2020. Further analysis revealed considerable differences between genders and other notable segments.

83.6% of survey respondents said they have health insurance, with women insured at a slightly higher rate (84.3%) than men (82.7%). However, men (66.9%) were significantly more likely to have updated their existing coverage or bought new coverage in 2020 than women (49%).

54.9% of survey respondents said they protect their loved ones with life insurance, with this percentage increasing to 60.4% among and decreasing to 50.5% among women. Upwards of 1 in 3 respondents (36%) with life insurance updated their existing policy or bought a new policy in 2020. This was most common among respondents who tested positive for COVID-19 (49.3%), first-time voters (49.5%), and those who plan to continue working from home (51.5%).

17.1% of survey respondents said they protect their income with disability insurance. A significant coverage gap emerged between high-income respondents (24.2) and medium-income respondents (21%), and low-income respondents (7.9%). This percentage increased to 27% among respondents who tested positive for COVID-19 and 23.8% among those who had a family member, friend, or coworker test positive.

Finally, 6.5% of survey respondents said they have critical illness insurance, a type of supplemental health coverage. Similar to disability insurance, this percentage spiked among respondents who tested positive for COVID-19, increasing to 11%.

This article originally appeared on Breeze.com and was syndicated by MediaFeed.org.

Image Credit: Michael Noonan / Wikimedia Commons.

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